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Motorrail


PeterH
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With the inevitable rise in electric cars with their comparatively low distance range what is needed it to bring back the old Motorrail service.

Mind I've always though it a shame it no longer operates. I would quite like to tour Scotland in the Spitfire but there's no way I would drive it from Devon.

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Pete, we have been to scotland twice in the last 3 weeks, first time up past Ullapool, 2nd time just across the border. Both trips start and finish in Brighton, 3k miles or so done. Car was great apart from (1) the crank spigot bearing failed on trip 1, but very intermittent so got us home, just required a quick box out/in. And (2) used just shy of 1/2L of oil. 

Drivers got a tad pink on the first trip, less so the 2nd. 

Go on, you can drive lands end to JOG in under 24 hours in a triumph. (that is a bit hardcore, but 150 Triumphs do it every other year as part of the RBRR) But throw in a couple of overnight stops, and you get a great roadtrip. We visited Telford area TSSC meet, went to liverpool, lancaster, brampton and lincoln as part of the trip. All part of my masterplan to do as many miles as possible while we and the car still can.

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Hi

Done, Yorkshire to Devon, In a Mk1 Escourt 1300 Estate, towing a 10ft caravan?. With Mirror Dinghy on the roof (they make great Airflow devices). Mind that was the 70`s and the M5 was still a dream!. If I remember we Overnighted somewhere near Worcester?. Yeovil to Aberdeen? 9hrs two alternate driving Mind that was in a Full Fat Granada Giha with all the bells and whistles. 105 comming down Shap on the way back. Scotland`s Georgeous, Just full of My relatives!. (Inlaws, and midges!)

 

Pete

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10 hours ago, PeteH said:

Hi

Done, Yorkshire to Devon, In a Mk1 Escourt 1300 Estate, towing a 10ft caravan?. With Mirror Dinghy on the roof (they make great Airflow devices). Mind that was the 70`s and the M5 was still a dream!. If I remember we Overnighted somewhere near Worcester?. Yeovil to Aberdeen? 9hrs two alternate driving Mind that was in a Full Fat Granada Giha with all the bells and whistles. 105 comming down Shap on the way back. Scotland`s Georgeous, Just full of My relatives!. (Inlaws, and midges!)

 

Pete

I am not keen on the midges. Never met your inlaws....

Funny how so many of us have had caravans in our life. I remember visiting relatives every year in North Wales, top of some huge mountain (probably nota mountain, but steep roads) in a morris oxford towing a caravan. People would come out of their houses to see if we made it up. The car that followed, a Wolsey 18/85 was much better. Must have been very early 70's.

Scotland, away from the massively busy areas (maybe unique to the current year) is gorgeous place to drive. And this year even the camper vans seem to be well behaved when they notice a car coming up behind them. Smidge spray is essential stuff though.

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I actually read somewhere that Switzerland or Sweden or some other S country was thinking of doing that... In fact the cars charge while on the train....

The thing is there are more than a handful of cars with 300+ mile ranges and full charging in under an hour so I don't know if this will be a thing for more than a few years...

Besides hydrogen has been  "just around the corner" for at least two decades so I am sure that will get resolved quickly *snark*

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In the old days you had Coaching or Staging Houses where you stopped for a change of horse and refreshment, or an overnight stay if required. With today's infrastructure I can see people becoming accustomed to stopping for longer, having a meal or shopping until the car is charged as opposed to the five minute refuel we're used to. This does mean leaving more time per journey but also having enough charging points so that people can leave their cars for the extended period. Locally we have one per car park, and one on the roadside, so that's four in total but it's the same people - usually the local business owner - who leaves their car plugged in all day while they're working and so anyone else has to go elsewhere. They're only charged for the power it takes, not the time, so same cost. If the same three or four people are going to tie up the chargers every working day it's no incentive for others to go electric.

However things are going full circle, as in this article from Wikipedia:

"On 5 August 1888, 39-year-old Bertha Benz drove from Mannheim to Pforzheim with her sons Richard and Eugen, thirteen and fifteen years old respectively, in a Model III, without telling her husband and without permission of the authorities, thus becoming the first person to drive an automobile a significant distance. Before this historic trip, motorized drives were merely very short trials, returning to the point of origin, made with assistance of mechanics. Following wagon tracks, this pioneering tour covered a one-way distance of about 106 km (66 mi).

Although the ostensible purpose of the trip was to visit her mother, Bertha Benz had other motives — to prove to her husband, who had failed to adequately consider marketing his invention, that the automobile in which they both had heavily invested would become a financial success once it was shown to be useful to the general public; and to give her husband the confidence that his constructions had a future.

She left Mannheim around dawn, solving numerous problems along the way. Bertha demonstrated her significant technical capabilities on this journey. With no fuel tank and only a 4.5-litre supply of petrol in the carburetor, she had to find ligroin, the petroleum solvent needed for the car to run. The solvent was only available at apothecary shops, so she stopped in Wiesloch at the city pharmacy to purchase the fuel. At the time, petrol and other fuels could only be bought from chemists, and so this is how the chemist in Wiesloch became the first fuel station in the world.

She cleaned a blocked fuel line with her hat pin and used her garter as insulation material. A blacksmith had to help mend a chain at one point. When the wooden brakes began to fail, Benz visited a cobbler to install leather, making the world's first pair of brake linings. An evaporative cooling system was employed to cool the engine, making water supply a big worry along the trip. The trio added water to their supply every time they stopped. The car's two gears were not enough to surmount uphill inclines and Eugen and Richard often had to push the vehicle up steep roads. Benz reached Pforzheim somewhat after dusk, notifying her husband of her successful journey by telegram. She drove back to Mannheim several days later."

So: give the electric car another 130 years and see where it stands then... :)

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"Range anxiety" is such a foolish thing!     What's the range of your IC  car? About 300 miles!

Sure, you can fill up in five minutes, but even at an average speed of 60mph, that will take you 5 hours to drive!     You really should take at least a twenty minute break before going on.

Remember - commercial drivers may not continue for longer than six hours without a break of at least 30 minutes, and never for more than 9 hours in a day.

 

Clive,  Like this?

John

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4 hours ago, Colin Lindsay said:

5 August 1888, 39-year-old Bertha Benz drove from Mannheim to Pforzheim with her sons Richard and Eugen, thirteen and fifteen years old respectively, in a Model III, without telling her husband and without permission of the authorities, thus becoming the first person to drive an automobile a significant distance. Before this historic trip, motorized drives were merely very short trials, returning to the point of origin, made with assistance of mechanics. Following wagon tracks, this pioneering tour covered a one-way distance of about 106 km (66 mi).

 

4 hours ago, Colin Lindsay said:

She left Mannheim around dawn, solving numerous problems along the way. Bertha demonstrated her significant technical capabilities on this journey. With no fuel tank and only a 4.5-litre supply of petrol in the carburetor, she had to find ligroin, the petroleum solvent needed for the car to run. The solvent was only available at apothecary shops, so she stopped in Wiesloch at the city pharmacy to purchase the fuel. At the time, petrol and other fuels could only be bought from chemists, and so this is how the chemist in Wiesloch became the first fuel station in the world.

 That is about about 8 miles away.. 🙂

There is still a pharamcy there and there is a plaque to commemorate it.

There is a replica of the car in Mannheim.

 

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5 hours ago, clive said:

I am not keen on the midges. Never met your inlaws....

Some are worse than the midges!. At least with the "beasties", you don`t finish up with the mother of all hangovers next day!.

Your right about caravans, We started back in `69, and have had a whole series since. Then Camper vans, American R-V`s and Now an "A" class motorhome. TBF, I guess I am one of those strange people who dislike Hotels?.

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