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To LED or not LED


Mathew
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there is a life expectancy with LED which is not proven well yet 

ye old seal beams can last 50 years 

halogens 10 years 

LED  who knows  

a local member with a MG6 has just had to pay £280 for a realamp and similar for  door mirror repeater  where the Leds have failed and not replaceable

wheres the economy in that daft idea 

sorry i will stick with bulbs and 14v at the front thanks 

Pete

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41 minutes ago, Pete Lewis said:

halogens 10 years 

My Halogens are around 25 years old. They are a proper sealed beam, many advertised as "sealed beam" have a picture of the glass with container and, a bulb!  On mine you can't get the bulb out and bulb failure would mean replacing the whole unit, which maybe why they've lasted so long. 

I believe there are legal issues with LED headlight conversions, but if you're buying the whole unit probably not a problem(?) However I would go with Halogen, brighter than traditional glow worms, but not as glaringly TOO BRIGHT as LEDs.  B)  Having said that I do have LED stop and side lights on the rear.

Doug

 

 

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3 minutes ago, dougbgt6 said:

I believe there are legal issues with LED headlight conversions, but if you're buying the whole unit probably not a problem(?)

The MOT rules were updated and made LED headlight units legal but LED bulbs illegal... Then about 2 weeks later they got updated again to make the LED bulbs legal again.  Not heard about a third update since then.

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I have LED side/brake/indicators/dash lights but still use sealed beam headlights, can't justify the cost as I don't intend to drive car at night but I do like the extra brightness of the brake lights and indicators as a good safety issue during normal daytime use, plus I can now see the green indicator warning light on the dash...

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I converted all my gauges and dashboard lights to green LEDs. I had some left over and did the footwell which looks really good. I tried one in the curtesy roof light, but that was too much. OK for Halloween, but a bit too gothic.

Doug

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Mathew

I have a mixture of bulbs on my GT6.

Headlights are Cibie H180 (7") with Philips Vision Plus halogen bulbs. These are awesome and make night driving a rear pleasure. (better than many moderns I'm sure).

I have LEDs in the front sidelights and the instruments.

Not yet converted the twin filament rear tail/stop lamps, but I do have an LED high level brake light, which is very bright. I think road users almost expect a H/L light these days, so I think this is an important safety feature.

Ian

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About 8 years ago I had to replace a suspended ceiling and fitted LED GU10 bulbs. 30 of them at what was phenomenal cost. Over the time I have replaced various bulbs (unreliable, andwent bang) and noticed the price coming down and that the quality and light output was going up. Not sure about the current 25,000 hours but the price has dropped from £10 each to about £2 each. The light output has gone from 250ish lumens to 600 ish. In the case of headlights, if you can, wait. The quality will improve and while classiccarled will supply you what you need at a price and, no doubt replace any faulty ones that blow within 12 months (25,000 hour guarantee??!!!) unless they give an extended warranty, and stay in business, I don't feel that it's worth the expense for the usage. If you are desparate for LEDs, I would personally go for the cheaper ones and carry spares. In a couple of years they will be better, cheaper and the Government may even have sorted out the !aw......no, scrub that last stupid statement!!

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Hi Folks,

as an experiment I fitted these Night Eye LED's  H4 LED's   about 4 years ago.

They are cheap and was expecting early failure - not so.  The output power appears to have stayed the same

I was not too keen on the bright white/silver illumination compared to the Philips/Osram warm/white glow.

However they work well and are a direct fit into H4 holders. I keep the Osram's as spares 

If your dynamo or iffy alternator needs help then LED's are a good way forward.

 

Roger

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Thankyou for all the responses. I have ordered a set of h4 halogen lights (the complete units) at some point i could change the bulbs for LED but will stick with tried and tested for now, the car is build with the best bits i have as spares, i had run out of headlamps and front side lights but i seam to have 4 pairs of rear lights!

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Sounds like a plan, i have about 3 spitfire wiring looms to sort out make into one good one for this car. Two have those night dimming relays! So i could incorporate the lighting relay as i install the other wiring.

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Mathew

This is a short 'how to' based on what I did. I'm no electrician, but the end result is neat and works well.

Headlight relays

(All colours are based on GT6 Mk2 wiring loom which uses bullet type connectors. Using tails as described allows the harness to converted back to original, by simply unplugging the additions)

Requirements

·         2No. standard 4 pin relays

·         Short lengths of colour coded wiring (if possible these can be salvaged from an old loom)

·         New fused feed wire (nice and thick)

·         Bullet and spade connectors (live ones should be insulated type)

Process

·         Split existing harness at connection between loom feeds and head light sub harnesses (UW=main UR=dip) 

·         Mount relays under lip of bonnet (one will be for main one for dip operating separately). 

·         Make up two pairs of short tails for both main and dip with one bullet and one spade to allow original harness to be joined to the relay, using colour coded wire if possible

·         From the original feed wires, connect to the bullet end of one of the links (using the original double or a new single inline) connector. Spade end goes onto the 86 terminal on relevant relay

·         Make up short tails (one red one black) to link terminals 30 and terminals 86 on the relays.

·         Bring a new heavy feed wire (red) from a permanent live (starter solenoid) or battery, via an inline fuse (or from a supplementary fuse box if available) and connect to terminal 30. Use a piggy back type spade connector on this. Add the red link tail between terminal 30 on each relay.

·         Provide a new earth from terminal 85 to chassis ground using a piggy back type spade connector. (this is just earthing the coil of the relay) Add the black link tail between terminal 85 on each relay.

·         Connect tails from terminal 87 on each relay to connect into each relevant sub harness.  

·         Check, stand well back…enjoy!

Ian

 

DSC_5708.JPG

4 pole relay.png

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A fairly good summary, although I'll await responses from those who haven't already done it as to how clear it is!

11 minutes ago, Ian Foster said:

Bring a new heavy feed wire (red) from a permanent live (starter solenoid) or battery

That should probably be a brown wire to fit with the standard colour coding. Also, while it's not the way Autosparks did it, when I fitted relays on my Vitesse I took this wire off the alternator. My thinking was mostly that it's nearer so the wire is shorter, but also the alternator is the primary source of power when the engine is running, and it has a very substantial feed from the battery for when it's not.

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With LEDs the chips will last for many hours but the little electronic components that keep them happy are the weak links.

A couple of months ago I replaced 100 light MR16 halogens with LED drivers and lamps in a customers house, they are hoping for a bit of power bill reduction.
That was a lot of ladder time for me
50 watt down to 10 watt should see some change in the bill if they turn all the lights on at once

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My experience of LEDs at home has been simple. Cheap LED bulbs don't last, especially downlights. They go very dim or start flashing. 

Buy quality (eg our kitchen has 15 downlights I installed 8 years ago, bought Philips, no problems at all

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I have managed to hoard (diligently acquire) a few spare of the 3 prong headlights for my Vitesse,i`m in no hurry to go LED.

I did however during my stripping of my Herald speedo to fix the odometer problem,replaced the backlights with LED`s from the supplier on one of the other replies,i think they are a definite improvement.

Steve

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37 minutes ago, Badwolf said:

My cheap fleabay leds for the dashboard have been wonderful. A great improvement on the originals even if replacing them did cost much skinning of knuckles etc.

In what way better? I am intrigued....

 

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