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Fuel blockage?


PaulBSpit1500
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Cleaned out my Spitfire 1500 fuel tank and this was the result, the five pence piece for comparison purposes only. I am hoping this was the cause of my fuel blockage that brought me to a stop on the A40 after driving some ten miles. When I disconnected the fuel line after the fuel pump and turned her over no fuel came spurting out. Took the top of the fuel pump and turned her over and the diaphragm was pumping ok. Disconnected the fuel line before the fuel pump and got a little dribble of fuel then nothing, I can understand that due to the fuel pick up system from the tank. I’m thinking or is that hoping that the pick up pipe in the tank got blocked. Poked all the lines through with strimmer chord and they are clear. I have ordered some DEOX-C, £16.75, to kill any rust in the tank, a new tank £286.01. Why the penny ? Also going to change the old rubber fuel lines for the new barricade fuel lines. So after filling with some high octane fuel, a carb clean and timing check I hope there are no more breakdowns for a while. Any comments ? 906A6BBB-EC0F-4B4E-9695-C2E82A10AB29.thumb.jpeg.62227ec4727307d2244bc60d46f0c2ef.jpegF6D9F211-78B0-45FD-84F1-253EAC34C7D0.thumb.jpeg.eab5e7715c99552042d0f698bab0cdb7.jpeg

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I suffered the indignity of breaking down within a few miles of home during my first drive after my car was delivered 😂

I tried Machine Mart Rust Remover flush including agitation with an added assortment of nuts and bolts etc etc. Pretty much a waste of time. I researched Fuel Tank ReNu versus the cost of a replacement and chose the latter. My new one is a lot lighter than the original - enough said.

With hindsight, I wish that I’d have had the original restored, albeit it was slightly more expensive than buying the new one.

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I made the mistake of treating my original tank (good, clean, essentially rust-free but had been stored for 25 years) to a treatment with POR15 fuel tank liner. Worst mistake possible. The stuff doesn't adhere right and flakes off, blocking the outlet and causing failure to proceed. Eventually I had to buy a new tank.

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26 minutes ago, NonMember said:

I made the mistake of treating my original tank (good, clean, essentially rust-free but had been stored for 25 years) to a treatment with POR15 fuel tank liner. Worst mistake possible. The stuff doesn't adhere right and flakes off, blocking the outlet and causing failure to proceed. Eventually I had to buy a new tank.

Interesting, Rob... I'm thinking of coating a couple of spare spare 13/60 and 1200 tanks in light of the increase in ethanol in fuel, and have been checking out a few products such as POR15, Flowliner Armour Coat or Petseal. These tanks have been drystored for years too, and are currently in primer. I wonder why yours didn't adhere?

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22 minutes ago, Colin Lindsay said:

I wonder why yours didn't adhere?

It is perfectly possible I did something wrong. I've also seen it stated that POR15 products actively need a rusty surface to bond to, which may be achieved by the pre-treatments in the kit but may not. On the other hand, I spoke to a local radiator specialist who were recommended for tank refurbishment - they said they no longer touch fuel tanks because none of the sealing or lining products are reliable enough and it's far too common for the lining to peel or flake off. I figured if the professionals are having the same trouble then it may not have just been my incompetence.

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My 13/60 was the same when i got it back on the road after a 30 year layup by the previous owner.I fitted all new rubber hoses and the carbs were rebuilt but it kept breaking down,i had to disconnect the line in the boot and blow down it which cleared it.

I used some tank sealer(name escapes me but i will check)poured in and sloshed around,then left for 4 days to go off.Car has been fine for 8 years so far.

S

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is this the Must Haves raising their Not Haves  problems 

getting paint to stick where you can get at it is often a headache   getting the inside you cant see well to a good condition  seems unreliable 

we need a supplier to invest in some plastic type tanks  but have to be E proof 

Fitchett have the tooling to  make new Herald tanks which adds space in a vitesse boot bu dont know if they do the spit Gt6  of their own 

again   an expensive   purchase   but its reliable 

Pete

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11 hours ago, PaulBSpit1500 said:

Cleaned out my Spitfire 1500 fuel tank and this was the result, the five pence piece for comparison purposes only. I am hoping this was the cause of my fuel blockage that brought me to a stop on the A40 after driving some ten miles. When I disconnected the fuel line after the fuel pump and turned her over no fuel came spurting out. Took the top of the fuel pump and turned her over and the diaphragm was pumping ok. Disconnected the fuel line before the fuel pump and got a little dribble of fuel then nothing, I can understand that due to the fuel pick up system from the tank. I’m thinking or is that hoping that the pick up pipe in the tank got blocked. Poked all the lines through with strimmer chord and they are clear. I have ordered some DEOX-C, £16.75, to kill any rust in the tank, a new tank £286.01. Why the penny ? Also going to change the old rubber fuel lines for the new barricade fuel lines. So after filling with some high octane fuel, a carb clean and timing check I hope there are no more breakdowns for a while. Any comments ? 

Hi Paul,

I have been experiencing a similar issue with my Vitesse; occasionally, shortly after start-up it will splutter to a halt.  It's done it three times now.  Initially, I thought it might have been an electrical issue but after a bit of investigation, it transpired that although the fuel pump was pumping, no fuel was getting through.  I assume that the delivery had stopped prior to start up, and the car had been running on the fuel in the float chambers.  It happened again on the way back from the TSSC Malvern event.  After a coffee-stop on the M4, it let me drive out of the services and back onto the motorway and then promptly stopped.  Fortunately there was a hard-shoulder and a grass bank, and I was able to pull off to relative safety.  I thought about calling for recovery but thought if I could fix it quickly, that would be the better option (thinking I could be waiting there for hours for recovery).  I took the fuel cap off, undid the supply pipe to the pump, got my head into the engine bay, drew a massive breath and blew down the pipe.  Even above the traffic noise, I could hear gurgling in the tank.  Checked the pump - now delivering fuel!  Started her up and quickly put the tools away and re-joined the Saturday evening M4 traffic.

The car was then fine for the next few days.  I'd put a shot of Ethanol protector stuff in, as well as shot of Redex but the car did the same trick last Sunday, and of course it stops where it stops, which can put you and the car in danger, so I have returned it to its barn, with a view to taking out the tank and cleaning it.  I am expecting it to produce a similar pile of rust as yours.

With regard to the internal coating products, I have seen a lot of bad reviews so I will start looking into a replacement tank.

I'll probably change the rubber hoses now, using the ones the club sells.

Tom

 

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Perhaps another solution is to research an off the shelf blow moulded tank that can be fitted with adaptor brackets. Virtually all moderns are plastic albeit of the 'saddle' type design or odd shapes. 

Just a thought, or of course aluminium. It is as always cost over reliability. 

Iain 

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I remember going on a rescue mission with Uncle Pete, we fixed the car in question but on the way back the plastic tank in Pete's Citroen tried to turn it's self inside out. We were only saved by turning a corner and as if by magic, there was a Citroen dealership! Plastic tanks? Don't trust 'em!

Doug

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that was the addblue tank not venting  yes sucked it flat  loads of lights comming on and the guy we fixed wasnt a member 

we decided he just wanted it fixed to sell    as cooker didnt work  and the promised bacon buttie was done on the BBQ 

never heard any thing from him since  ...we learnt to be more selective Ha 

TomL  the fichetts tank is herald size  not a problem unless you need a long range and they dont have the rusty drainspout or the reserve lever ste up

its a lot simpler and less hassle . 

Pete

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Back to original problem, consult a local stripping company.    Ribble Technology in Preston just stripped an engine block for me, and produced the cleanest block I've ever seen!   Much better than any home brew, or DiY method!

John

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Back to the plot, which for me is unusual. I believe that the best way the sort out a rusty petrol tank is first to take it out and drain. Insert gravel or chain and rattle around until you are totally knackered. Flush out with water to get rid of the bits. If using the Frost products, clean with their cleaner, wash, treat with the rust/metal prep, wash and then comes the tricky bit..thoroughly dry. Hot air gun, hair dryer anything but it must be absolutely, totally dry. Any trace of damp/airborne moisture absorption and the POR paint treatment will, without any shadow of a doubt, peel off. This is one of the things that has put me off the POR products. If it's done correctly it is great, if not, pain and heartache. I say that I believe, only because I have not used (I have used the chassis paint stuff) it but have a recommendation for this routine from an acquaintance. You pays your money.......

John's recommendation for Ribble is a good one. They have a great reputation.

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I have read several bad reports from amateurs who have used products to coat the tank and it’s been a horrible failure. The paint not adhering and flaking away. One report of a company stopping offering the tank refurbishment service due to flaking paint. So I will not be going down this route. DEOX-C to remove what is left of the rust then reinstall the tank and top up with petrol. I just hope the rust removal process does not expose any further issues, pinholes in the tank? 

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