Jump to content

crank pully


mikemunro
 Share

Recommended Posts

Who knows?   

These damper pulleys are all nearly 40 years old or more, and in the day they gave people like Kastner problems when the rubber gave way.

2.5's have a bigger pulley/damper, os I thin k we should assume there was a reason.

The reason for the damper at all was to damp (!) out resonance in the long crankshaft.   It would not surprise me, although I can't calculate it, that a long shaft with greater stroke would need more damping.

 

The only way to find out is on a test bed engine, and measure the resonance - and I'm working on that.

 

JOhn

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

HI All, does anyone have any sugestions how I can undo the crank pully nut on my 1500 Spitfire? I have the correct size socket with 3/4 inch drive and with the car in 4th gear, foot brake on hard and a 5ft scafold pole extention on the tommy bar it wont move! All that happens is that it winds up the transmission.

​Thanks in advance for any suggestions. Grahame 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

you can seriously over wind the transmission with scaffold poles and wreck the clutch disc,as the engine only produces 82lbft 

 

you can use a socket and bar up against the chassis and give the starter a quick crank,  keep fingers out the way

(do remove the coil feed you dont want it to start)

 

i use a  1/2 drive battery impact wrench  whizz them off in seconds 

 

Pete

Link to comment
Share on other sites

think from whats in parts books TR used same base pulley but 1/2" wide belt  where most 2000/25000 used same base pulley but has a 3/8" wide belt 

 

all the data suggests you check belt width and order accordingly the correct width groove pulley  

 

the fitting , diameter and damping appears to be the same   

 

any other clues about  ???

 

 

just make sure the damper ring is actually  bonded to the inner , if it rotates it plays havoc with any timing settings

(got that tee shirt some years back)

 

pete

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've mentioned this before, but in this context no harm in a repeat.

And it's straight from Kastner's books.

 

If you KNOW that the outer rim has not moved on the rubber - TDC on the scale corresponds with TDC on No.1 piston - then drill a hole into the depth of the Vee, right down into the inner hub of the pulley.

Check that you can drop a split pin, or a length of wire in.

In future, checking is just dropping the pin again.  If it won't go, the pulley is a no-no!

 

John

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Pete

Thanks for the prompt reply on removing the crank pulley nut. As I was going to take the engine out anyway, I removed the sump and wedged the crank, with the socket on the nut I just gave the tommy bar a couple of whacks with a club hammer and it soon came undone!

Thanks again, Grahame 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know I've posted this before somewhere but after three days on a Spitfire 1500 crank pulley with a six feet breaker bar, all kinds of sockets, heat, penetrating oil, me standing on the bar and jumping up and down, I actually bent a huge screwdriver around the crank whilst jamming the engine through the petrol pump aperture, and so gave in and bought an impact wrench which removed the nut in 20 seconds or so. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 This wont do a crank nut  but.........I dont need another but in a Homebase sale last week our local was selling a own brand! Guild 3/8" drive 18v lithium batteried for £20   just should have bought all the stock and sold them on   I just had to have just one more 

its a neat well balanced addition to ALL THE OTHERS    !!!!!

 

pete

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I bought a £20 drill from the Orange shop, as my Granddaughter calls it. Sainsburys to you and me. It lasted 2 months, I deduced the battery was the problem so opened it up. Inside were a dozen or so AA batteries all wired together.  I'm told this is not uncommon but in this case there was no packing, the batteries were just loose, they rattled about and of course the solder joints broke. I re-soldered, packed them out and it worked, for another 2 months. This time the batteries wouldn't hold a charge, I considered replacing them with decent batteries but this would then put the price of the drill in the "Why didn't I buy a quality drill in the first place?" class. Beware cheap drills!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...