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Interesting speech….


Colin Lindsay
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I found this one whilst idly surfing today (waiting on the family to get themselves in gear and out of the house…!)

"A speech by Glenys Stacey, Chief Regulator, at the Inside Government conference on GCSE and A level reform."

​It’s interesting in that she uses the analogy of the Standard Motor Company to illustrate her concept of education, and makes a few arguably incorrect comments about the Triumph Herald:

 

"The company’s new flagship vehicle, the Triumph Herald, was poorly received by the public, being viewed as both expensive and of poor quality."

 

“The most important is to remember is that what is being created must meet our end user’s wants and needs. The Triumph Herald arguably failed on all these fronts."

 

​You may want to read the entire speech and see the context in which these quotes were used… it’s interesting to see an ‘outsider’s’ view…. 

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/speeches/raising-the-standard

 

 

 

 

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But an incompetent analysis.

Triumph Herald production dates: 1959-1971, 12 years.

Compare:

Ford Anglia 105E, 1959-1967, 8 years  (Preceding models, entirely different cars, no successor) 

Hillman Minx (four models) 1945-1970 That WAS a success!

Hillman Imp 1963-1967 four years!

Mini (BMC production) 1959-1968.

 

The last, of course, was one of the greatest successes in motor manufacturing and went on in production under British Leyland, and then Rover Group until 2000, but note the last date of production of all the other cars, that ended as the 60s did, when in an ill-advised attempt to amalgamate all UK car manufacturing, inevitably competing models and brands had to be terminated.    That was the cause of the demise of Triumph, not due just to poor quality, expensive cars but to the dreadful state of British industrial relations and management.   Triumph were no better than any other company in this respect, but do not forget that the demise of BMC was due to the fact that they could not cost the Mini, and sold it through most of its life at a loss.

 

John

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Was the mini a success? I've seen a couple of programmes on the TV that claimed it was built and sold at a loss. Brilliant car to drive though, but some irritating faults. Must have been not too bad, kept mine for 12 years! I bought my GT6 straight after my mini was beyond help, I remember thinking how much better everything was engineered. Later on I got a Ford company car and thought the same again!

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John you Imp dates are a bit short ...only because i bought my first New car a   Super Imp in 68   ( mk 2 with the front camber correct)

 Production‎: ‎1963–1976; 440,032 made

 

she was a flyer and pulled over 7k in top gear then run off the rev counter thats over 106mph  and still pulling  used to annoy granada's and capri in its day

 

 

Standard were quite good at introducing new techy, My Mum worked at Standard as a I think a punch card operator /comptometer up till 1939

they brought  in some automated machines but they could not keep up with her input ....she had a award for that and some notes in the  Co magazine 

but i have none to refer  to  .

 

Pete

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Was the mini a success? I've seen a couple of programmes on the TV that claimed it was built and sold at a loss. Brilliant car to drive though, but some irritating faults. Must have been not too bad, kept mine for 12 years! I bought my GT6 straight after my mini was beyond help, I remember thinking how much better everything was engineered. Later on I got a Ford company car and thought the same again!

Read my last line?

JOhn

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Apologise! But, are you sure that wasn't a crafty edit?!! :lol:  Can it be a success when it never made any money? On the other hand it was my favourite ever car to drive, so I suppose it was a success in that respect. A bit like Concord, a dreadful money pit, but everybody loves it. Except me, I was once parked on the tarmac at Heathrow when it took off and the boom blew my mini's windows in!

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Actually the seats in the concord are a bit cramped as it's quite small and claustrophobic on the inside. I've never flown in it but I used to work for BA at Heathrow and we used to crawl all over them at every opportunity. I hear a consortium has bought one from a museum in France and intend to get it air born again.

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I visited the one they have in Barbados in May, and while it is a superb piece of engineering, it certainly is cramped inside, but then because it went like a bat out of hell, you weren't on it for that long! The passageway to the cockpit door was too narrow for my shoulders, and the cockpit is very cramped. In essence, it was an elongated and oversize fighter, and my favourite Concorde story is of the test pilot who barrel rolled one to prove it.

 

Some of the comments on the demise of our motor industry on this thread are thought-provoking. The Mini was certainly a brilliant and effective design, but it took Ford to take one apart and discover that BMC were making it at a loss. It set the template for the modern supermini, but the transmission in the sump was a developmental blind alley, and robbed it of any chance of ever getting a gearbox that suited the new motorways, and the only one with a hatchback was Ringo Starr's!

 

I was in the engineering industry in the late 70s to mid-eighties for a Birmingham-based company, and saw at first hand the ills afflicting it, and it wasn't only trades union militants. The managers I worked for were largely anti-intellectual, experience alone was all that mattered. I lost count of the number I heard dismissing computers as irrelevant. Plant and machinery was left to stagger on past obsolescence. Overall there was an attitude that wen "we are the home of engineering, no foreigner can teach us anything, we don't need to learn these new-fangled techniques and university is a waste of time" All the while Germany and Japan were investing in plant, and in the best graduates - it is little wonder we were stuffed.

 

As for Triumph - I learned to drive in a Toledo, and I always felt that Triumph gave you that bit more in creature comforts and finish than a Ford, but the engineering was obsolete by comparison.

 

Regards

 

Steve C

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we had a spread of machines at Commer /Dodge/Renault with CNC lathes and mills alongside a 1912 pillar drill/mill that was a flat belt converted to motor drive and just used to tap the oil filler plug holes on rear axle diff rear tin hats   before they were robot welded onto the axle case 

it was still a runner when they closed the site in 93   so sometimes old machines do a good job depending on volume and it didnt owe anyone a bean

conversely the CNC stuff was sold for a song and owed everyone a fortune 

 

  its a balance act 

 

         Pete

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My dad also worked for British Airways, except he did 37 years and I only managed 5! For 15 years he was in Seattle working at the Boeing factory checking out Jumbos before BA signed the cheque. He told me that one of the Boeing test pilots was sacked for doing a barrel roll in a 747. Don't know if it's true!

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Don't know about a barrel roll, but I do about what happened when the last Concorde left Filton.

It was supposed to take off, do a circuit and then fly past the airfield where all the BAC workers were assembled having a farewell party.

What did happen was that as he completed the circuit and lined up on the main runway, the pilot hit both throttles AND the afterburners, overtook the Red Arrows who were supposed to escort him, and beat up the runway at zero feet.

I know, because I was working at Southmead Hospital next door which was reduced to chaos, by just the NOISE!

 

JOhn

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