Jump to content

Blonde Moments


Pete Lewis
 Share

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, Chris A said:

Those indians are after me but I'm still rolling along. Two wheels on . . .

No never heard of it I'm too young 🙊

It's actually Cherokees that are chasing me... darned Fords never give up, do they?

JEEP-Cherokee.jpg.cad027e6c2b218c11a2e6ec65d8aeb79.jpg

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

And today's disasters due to loss of grey matter...

Welding two bits of mild steel... no spark. Had forgotten to connect the earth clamp. Tried again; weld very porous. Not enough gas? Checked the cylinder; gas not turned on. Eventually got sorted, started work on the 1200 engine. Fitted a new spigot bush and whilst torquing the bolts up to 42 or so the engine tilted and majestically rolled off the wooden pedestal... and squashed the alloy backplate. Not sure if I can reuse it or not, I can test for straightness but the cutout for the starter is deformed both sideways and backwards. Back to the metal one... :(

3953D133-1AF7-4EB1-A144-0C1ED051B826_1_105_c.jpg.b6d35ff728f26abea891103de143b080.jpg  024651BF-DB9D-4071-B6FF-174F6913A381_1_105_c.jpg.3165c495f5ed269863b7a89dd5e9c537.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd have thought that was savable.  Remove, lay on top of steel one, apply percussive maintenance.

It's not like you need a precision machined flat surface, just a "flat-enough to stop crap getting in".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, Colin Lindsay said:

I've heard enough over the years about bent backplates causing clutch problems so immediately assumed the worst, and will work backwards from there.

I think there would be a difference between a bent steel plate and a bent aluminum one.  Bolt up the gearbox and the steel ain't going anywhere, so will pulls the gearbox out of alignment.  Certainly with a steel gearbox bellhousing, bolt that up and I'm not sure the gearbox wouldn't remain aligned/the back plate get straightened*.

The steel backplate sandwich and big hammer should be a winner though.

 

* Except Sod's Law would apply, so you'd probably end up straightening it enough to make you THINK it was flat but actually also get enough gearbox miss-alignment to give you issues in 6 months time :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, Colin Lindsay said:

I have two spare metal backplates, might do a sandwich repair. :)

I've heard enough over the years about bent backplates causing clutch problems so immediately assumed the worst, and will work backwards from there.

Hi Colin,

 your use of the word 'metal' for steel sent me back about 30 years. Helping the Scouts recycling Aluminium drinks cans.

Very simple task - using a magnet if it didn't stick it was Aluminium (££££) if it did stick it was 'Metal' (sadly not Gold etc)

I tried to explain to the Scout leader and the lads but it was all too much.

Thanks for the memory

 

Roger

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, RogerH said:

Hi Colin,

 your use of the word 'metal' for steel sent me back about 30 years.Roger

I write as I think or speak so would say metal, not to mention oldie words like motor, The Pictures, wireless, all the words of my childhood, and to really confuse things a lot of local Ulster-Scots words like footling, fissling and scobing. So: a bit of footerin about has straightened the backplate - the part that attaches to the engine was undamaged, just the loop for the starter motor, and using a spacer as a template it's now round and flat again. I hope so as it was fitted this morning along with the clutch and gearbox.

Whoever sent me the bellhousing fitting kit also had a blonde moment - bar the two starter bolts, none of the other nuts fit their respective bolts. All too small.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a sadly empty bottle of Mount Gay rum which I keep because it's marked 77% proof. They don't make it anymore, because you can't take it on an aeroplane. But that really did make things move around.

Doug

Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, dougbgt6 said:

I have a sadly empty bottle of Mount Gay rum which I keep because it's marked 77% proof. They don't make it anymore, because you can't take it on an aeroplane. But that really did make things move around.

Doug

I had several "voyages" to the Carribean, One ship had a hold tweendeck "bonded" and filled with barrels of RAW rum. The sort of stuff that sent you blind!. The "chippy" (carpenter) found a way in and was tapping the barrels with a tiny drill and taking "samples", covering up his larceny by hammering in tiny slivers of wood. The "other ranks" where paying him and drinking it as "grog" with water. We had two hospitalised when we arrived at Liverpool!.

Pete

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I forgot to reconnect a caliper and attempted to bleed the brakes...

I was blonde once...

I also forgot to reconnect the ground/earth and wondered why the car wouldn't turn over...

I don't wear glasses (yet) but I am sure I will look for them while they perch on my smooth skull...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry to be pedantic but it it is 40% alcohol by volume. Stroll used to produce a rum that was 80% by volume which you could buy at Amsterdam Airport but again it was later banned on flights as a flammable liquid.  Prior to modern instrumentation, French brandy was imported in barrels at 100% proof.  To test the strength, you mixed the brandy with gunpowder.  If it burnt in a controlled manner it was 100% proof.  If it flared up it was too strong and extra tax was payable; if it would not burn, someone had been watering down the drinks.  If you are old enough, I am, you may remember whisky being labelled 70 deg. proof which in todays terms is 40% by volume.  The USA simplified the system in calling 40%  by volume 80 deg. proof so 80% by volume was 160 deg. proof.  It was in Russia at the end of the 19th century that they standardised vodka at 40% but that is another story.

End of lecture !

Link to comment
Share on other sites

County Fermanagh had a lot of stuff sold in plastic containers with no labels... you had to know 'the man' who would get you some. I've no idea of what proof it was but you didn't smoke near it.

There were all sorts of concoctions; it wasn't unusual to go into someone's house and see an old dear filling sweetie jars with the stuff then dissolving huge quantities of brandy balls in it and leaving it to ferment. I remember quite a tasty version called 'Dark Early'. It's not surprising they dance the way they do; it probably evolved from people trying to walk to the loo after a few glasses. Your legs go mad but your arms won't work.

You can buy a weak touristy version of the stuff but it's like drinking tap water in comparison.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, Badwolf said:

I have a memory that the way of calculating the 'proof'  of spirits was to multiply the % vol by 8/5 (eight fifths) to get the proof. I have no idea why, and haven't looked it up as yet.

I think you have just converted Miles into Kilometers.

 

Roger

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...