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65 Herald 1200 fuel lines and more….


Tom
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Hello, it’s been a while but after lots of repairs to the chassis and rear tub the two are finally together! She’s no show car but she’s solid and maybe one day I’ll treat her to a full body spray!!

I’m at the point I want to fit the fuel tank, I’m fitting all new lines but I can’t remember the routing the copper pipe that goes from the rubber hose that joins to the tank to the long line from the front of the car. Essentially the bendy one one that gets past the rear wheel/ drive shaft etc.

Also it looks a lot easier to fit the rear lights and wiring loom before the tank too but again I remember the exact routing of the loom?

 

if anyone could help with either of these problems I’d be very grateful.

 

Thanks, Tom.

5C2565E1-B8E0-4F9F-8C6F-0B64E362012A.jpeg

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i would fit the overrider before you add the tank  

on mine the Overriders  had studs and wing nuts  as an idea to make removal simple not that you need to remove them 

as you said lamp wiring is best done before tank fitment 

Pete

 

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Yes I had to destroy the captive nuts and cut the long 3/8 unf bolt to get mine off so I’ll have to use an alternative fixing method.

Its more the fuel pipe routing and wiring routing I need help with.

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The loom at the rear follows the line of the inside rear wing, entering through the small hole at the bottom of the b-post; you can see the clips spaced along the inside to hold it up. It splits where the rear deck is, the number plate light and driver's side cables run along the underside of the deck. On te passenger side it runs more or less along the top of the tank to the rear light area. If you identify the loom clips on the bodywork they're a great help.

The fuel pipe emerges through the boot floor and then makes its' way to the rear of the chassis where it loops out to clear the rear upright, then back in tight under the rear axle and parallel to the brake lines along the chassis. I've found a photo of my current Herald before I replaced them, you might be able to see why as they're not the neatest, but I curved the new pipes round the wheel arch and part of the way up the rear outrigger to give a nicer appearance before bending out round the chassis as before. As is typical these days I photographed the new pipes and can't find the photo...

IMG_1680.thumb.jpeg.f94fa855fc72111ed007a586882be036.jpeg

 

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Passenger side. It feeds through the hole / grommet above the control box / regulator and forks across behind the dash or down to the floor, then follows the channel in the floor pans to the B-post. There's a pressed channel in the floor pans for it.

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Getting close to putting the rear valance and rear quarter valances.

Do they just bolt on metal to metal or is there some sort of product that goes between the quarters and the rear wing to fill the seam?

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Metal to metal, no mastic or other filler. I have usually had the car sprayed with them removed, then the sprayed valences bolted on, but the only time one was sprayed with the valences on, the sprayer ran a thin bead of a sealant (Painter's Mate?) across the seam and sprayed over that.

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Ok, I’m painting the valances off the car. I’ll do them early next week, I’m filling and painting my rear wing repairs at the moment so with a little luck the valances will be on next weekend, tank in and lights back in.

thanks, Colin

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Just whilst I’m thinking of jobs I’ll be doing over the next few weeks can I ask a few more questions?

I’ve had the entire rear suspension and transmission off the car and rebuilt it all, currently the bolts that connect the ends of the spring to the hub carrier are all still loose as if I remember from my Spitfire days these should be nipped up with the suspension loaded and sitting properly level. Is this the same for the Herald?

and secondly, although I put the spacers that go between the rear control arms and the chassis I wouldn’t be surprised with the amount of work I’ve done to the chassis and suspension that the rear wheels aren’t pointing where they should be! Is this a specialist setting up job or can it be done by a DIY method?

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10 hours ago, Tom said:

Just whilst I’m thinking of jobs I’ll be doing over the next few weeks can I ask a few more questions?

I’ve had the entire rear suspension and transmission off the car and rebuilt it all, currently the bolts that connect the ends of the spring to the hub carrier are all still loose as if I remember from my Spitfire days these should be nipped up with the suspension loaded and sitting properly level. Is this the same for the Herald?

and secondly, although I put the spacers that go between the rear control arms and the chassis I wouldn’t be surprised with the amount of work I’ve done to the chassis and suspension that the rear wheels aren’t pointing where they should be! Is this a specialist setting up job or can it be done by a DIY method?

Somewhere on this forum, there is a "distertation", which shows a DIY method, I think Curtesy of "uncle Pete". involving lenghts of wood and string?. A trawl of the Chassis and suspension thread might be in order?.

Your obviously closer to that point than I. I`m only just starting to Paint Prep;. Once primed all my seams will be covered with a flexible sealer where not obvious. and some more sound insulation is in the pipeline too.

Pete

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Tracking can be done at home. I used a tape measure and 2 lengths of steel (sat on bricks) to set the front wheels parallal. Then 4 axle stands, although  anything firm enough and about 12" tall would work, to set string up each side of the car parallel to the front wheels. A bit of jigglin and measuring from wheel hubs to check the string was parallel to the car centre line, and measured string to string to check too.

Then you can adjust away using a ruler to measure the distance of the front and rear of reach wheel to the string.

I used some heavy stuff to replicate just me in the car. 

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Thanks chaps, I’ll have a look for that.

Pete, I’ve used Tiger seal on my repaired welds, seems to have worked well and can be painted.

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6 hours ago, Tom said:

Am I right about tightening the Suspension bolts in the loaded postion?

I understand that with standard bushes, yes. With Poly bushes, the bush is free moving around the crush tube, so not necessary. 

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does matter what the material is if its got a crush tube then the bush turns around that its the only way they can work

if its a bonded tube thats different 

i would still nip them up as on road to avoid any screw up of the bush   as a matter of why not 

Pete

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  • 2 weeks later...

Almost there now! It’s the prom on Thursday so my daughter is happy as it looks like I’ll be taking her in it!

most of the interior is back in but what is baffling me is how the static seat belts go back in as there only seems to be the one fixing point on the B post behind the seat and also where does the short piece that the belt plugs into and has the release button bolt to? I also have a thick spacer for one of the fixing points but can’t remember where and how that is used too?

 

thanks, Tom

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According to the free to download workshop manual there should be a fixing point by each B post, then another further across on each side of the propshaft tunnel and the last, in a convertible, is on each rear wheel arch so that the belts feed through a slot in the rear quarter trim panels👍  

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1 hour ago, johny said:

According to the free to download workshop manual there should be a fixing point by each B post, then another further across on each side of the propshaft tunnel and the last, in a convertible, is on each rear wheel arch so that the belts feed through a slot in the rear quarter trim panels👍  

This is a 1200, the belts don't go through the panels to the rear wheel arch. The three mounting points depending on the age of the car are centre tunnel (either top dual mount, or separate one each side) top of B-post, and floor beside seat, which will either be a loop in the floor or else a captive nut on the side of the floorpan area.

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Still scratching my head on this one, but I think I’ve found the mounting points, the mystery is there are no holes the carpet so god knows where they were mounted, it was ten years ago I took it all apart though!!!

there are two holes on the propshaft tunnel and two holes next to the seats by the sills. I had a look at my mates 13/60 and he has loops at approximately these places, his belts clip onto these but mine are bolt on types. Maybe I could make some loops and thread my belt ends through?

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F13D2867-8B5E-4E6F-BDDE-8DD1B716883C.jpeg

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If your centre mounting point is on top of the centre tunnel ie those two holes they are threaded into a reinforcement behind; look for threads inside the holes. If they've been drilled out you can probably make up a reinforcing plate that will permit nuts and bolts, but the correct mounting is a large plate for the seatbelts that sits on top of the carpet.

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Bottom left is the correct bracket. For the side fittings my early Heralds have loops - the red car has two drilled across (the rusty ones not the grommets) and the brown car in the photo below has them drilled front to back; the holes / loops beside the large drain hole in the floorpans.

grommets.jpg.18c6a82f94eece89d4f89c18c4ea456c.jpg  440566024_seatbelts.jpg.24e40ad98ec52c864ca663d2270592ee.jpg

I made up a new set of loops for them with larger reinforcing plates (the rusty one is the original) but the belt needs to be able to clip on; that's the required bracket to the centre right in the selection photo.

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If yours just has a large hole in the side of the tub plus a matching hole in the seatbelt bracket then you'll need a proper seatbelt bolt plus a spacer (to allow the belt to rotate freely) and a locking plate for the outside which the bolt screws into. Easily obtainable, photo attached. Just make sure you get the correct one for the Triumph as there can be different models and sizes.

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A not very clear picture of mine if it helps. Can do a better one at weekend if needed.

If you're able to make it out, it is a thick triangular plate with and upturned flange along the forward edge.

A U-bolt carrying the belts and buckles is bolted to the flange.

The whole assembly is bolted down through the two holes, to another thick plate under the floor.

This is a mid 1965 built car, later cars we're done differently, with eyebolts in the chassis.

Capture.JPG

 

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