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paul@corvon.net
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I have acquired from my cousin a 1969 2L Mk2 Vitesse with 42,000 genuine miles on the clock. It was dismantled in 1976 and has been stored in a dry garage since then. The engine was sound when dismantled, the oil was left in whilst it was stored. This is my first car rebuild so would appreciate advice on how much intervention I should initially do on the engine. The engine turns over by hand smoothly, all the plugs look good, i am tempted to do as little as possible, try and get her going and deal with any problems I then find. Guidance please?!!! 

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Good battery , fresh fuel and check the points are not seized,

I would go as far as new points and plugs being life and souL of the engine

You can fire it up on the old oil  as a test but if you run for long realy its false economy  get some fresh 20 50 

Air filters of that age will not be suitable , the paper ellement clogs with age , 

Makemsure the air piston in the carbs is free, engine oil in the dashpots

Be prepared for debris in the fuel tank lines and pump filter.

Pete

 

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I have worked with a lot of engines that have stood for a long time, Pete has given a good start but only run untile warm and then drain oil and then use a flushing oil as a sediment will have formed, then use fesh oil (chenge the filter for the flush and the fresh oil. Also whatch out for leaks from the water pump gland seal and crank shaft seals, they dry out (what ever you do don't use a seal softener, you know the things that say they stop leaks).

One thing with engines that have been left with oil engine oil in, is it contains acid and this can etch the bearing surfaces, though not normally badly, but worth taking it easy for the first couple few miles to allow them to run in again and allow the piston rings to free up.

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In the olde days a mix of 50%oil and parrafin used to be run idling to shift grime, you either love or hate this old nutshell

Washing old caked  grime is not always a good thing ,  it goes from being settled to being spread everywhere

I guess you could make a pump to stick a tube up the sump drain and squirt around to remove sump stuff by trial  

Its all down to preference, and worried or ...not

Pete

 

 

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From experience a seized master cylinder is bad news. The problem is DOT4 on lower are hydroscopic (absorbs water from the air) and this causes galvanic corrosion between the steel, copper and aluminium alloy components. Normally once you get the master cylinder apart you find pitting in the bore and works out cheaper to replace it. If the master cylinder is seized, before proceeding check the bleed nipples will undo on the wheel cylinders (as you will need to open them to bleed the system and if the master cylinder is corroded they will probably be as well, so you can get new wheel cylinders at the same time). While you are at it check the brake adjusters are free and give them a good dose of WD40. You may find you calliper pistons have corroded as well, as you may end up doing all the other work on the bakes it would be worth getting seal sets for them and be prepared to get new pistons, check the flexible pipes as well!

Sorry to hit you with this but brakes, suspension and clutches do not like standing still for a long time. I always bleed hydraulic systems that have been standing (for more than a year) and exercise them on any of my cars that are laid up for winter once a month and do an engine run.

As for you chrome and alloy trim, I tend to clean them down with WD40 and if they need polishing use Soval Autosol but other may have better suggestions.

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I agree with Algy and if you replacing masters and slaves, now would be the ideal time to upgrade to silicone fluid. Dot 3/4/5.1 should all be changed every couple of years due to the water absorption. Silicone lasts almost indefinitely and although more expensive you're quid's in, in the end. Also it doesn't eat the bulkhead paint!

Doug

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Silicone brake fluid is very good although can be a pain to bleed as it aerates easily and so some complain of a spongy peddle, the answer is to leave it standing for 48 hours and then pore it down the side of a funnel and start with a gravity or vacuum bleed.

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Doug,

No War. You pay your money and consider your use and make a choice. Unless you are racing the compressibility is not a major factor but most have more compressibility than they should because they have aerated the fluid during filling.

I use it in all my classics (except the Elan which I do the occasional track day and replace fluid every spring) after doing a full brake or clutch system rebuild with new seals and have done for over 20 years with no problems.

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And as Buckeye comments:

"Silicone based fluid retains small suspended air bubbles.  This requires extra care when filling the reservoir and may require a subsequent bleeding a few days after first filling the system to extract any air bubbles that remained in suspension during the initial bleeding."

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