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Hi all,

 

I mentioned in another post (http://forum.tssc.org.uk/index.php?/topic/2157-vitesse-up-for-grabs/) that I'm moving away to Cyprus for a couple of years and am considering my options with the Mk1 2l Convertible Vitesse. Best case scenario is that I take it with me and use it out there, but I'm not sure how feasible it is. I barely have the knowledge, tools, space and time as it is but I've got along with it for the past 6-7 years. Cyprus is a bit of a gamble though.

 

What I need is a plan, and the best plans are made on a basis of knowledge and experience (you see my problem). If anyone who knows their way around these things well enough would be willing to have a good look over it with me (I'd go to them of course, with a crate of something in the back!), I'd feel a lot more confident about committing to taking it out there and the necessary preparations.

 

I'm happy to stump up some cash and somehow make the time to improve its general condition but I'd hate to learn that it all needs to come off again because of a previous bodge-job or some nasty rot etc...

 

I have an ambition to drive it back to the UK from Greece in 2019, and provided everything is in good order I see no reason why it shouldn't manage. I would of course be taking out European breakdown cover.

 

I'm located in Shrivenham between Swindon and Oxford but I trust the car to get me elsewhere within reason. I'd be very grateful if anyone is well placed and willing to help.

 

Many thanks,

 

Shaunpost-1882-0-75199200-1485520635_thumb.jpgpost-1882-0-86163600-1485520650_thumb.jpg

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Don't forget that Cyprus has many local small-garage or back-street mechanics, many of whom are well at home with this age of car if the rest of Greece is anything to go by. It may seem daunting now but once you get it there you'll soon find the local experts to assist and repair as required, and a lot more cheaply than in the UK.

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Shaun.

 

Can I suggest enlisting the help of someone at your local area meeting; if you do not already attend. I think that would be a very useful start point and you will get unbiased advice which may also open more doors for you regarding this situation.

 

Colin's reference to Cyprus and Greece is well founded, it's a useful place to be if you have a classic car and perhaps an email to the International AO's within TSSC may be able to provide an insight for contacts whilst abroad.

 

I think that is the start of your plan IMHO.

 

Regards.

 

Richard.

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Colin - I've heard that too, especially in the Turkish North, and if it's true then that could be a real bonus. All the more reason to get an assessment of what's needed while I'm here I suppose; both because back-street mechanics speaking another language could have its cons as well as its pros, and it might be easier to source any bits I need and take them with me.

 

Richard - I've been to a couple and at the Newbury meet I met someone who might be interested in looking after it in my absence. Attendance is pretty low at this time of year though so thought I might reach more people on these means. I'll definitely look into finding people out there, boots on the ground would be a great asset right now!

 

Thanks both.

 

Shaun

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Shaun, I assume you're going to the Greek South end of the island? If so you won't be driving your car to the Turkish North anytime soon, or visa versa. Getting from one end to the other is difficult if not dangerous. Some unwary tourists went North by boat and had a great deal of trouble getting back into the South. There are talks going on now to try and finally resolve the Cyprus political situation but don't hold your breath!

 

On a happier note Cyprus was once a British dependency and it still has a very British feel to it, quite different from Greece. Also tourism is a big part of their economy and English widely spoken.

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