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STROMBERG CARBS - VITESSE Mk2


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Hello.

 

A correct set of Vitesse Mk2 carbs are on Ebay - require overhauling.

 

On EBay and ends about 7.40pm this evening

 

Regards.

 

Richard.

 

 

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Triumph-Vitesse-Stromberg-150CD-carburettors-pair-GT6-2000/253058606129?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649

 

http://zenithcarb.co.uk/cf/vehicle/list/?manufacturer=Triumph&vehicle=Vitesse

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Hello.

 

You have probably noted I have flagged up the Burlen Ltd website, specifically the Zenith Stromberg carb tab - it has some excellent technical & general info on there. 

 

http://zenithcarb.co.uk/?___store=zenith

 

In addition there is also a useful tab titled "Stay Up" and is an interesting & informative read regarding the manufacture of replacement carb floats which are also designed to be ethanol resistant; very useful to know.

 

http://stayupfloats.co.uk/?___store=stayup

 

Hopefully the above links will be of interest and perhaps useful for some - the actual Burlen Website is very informative and gives exact specification on the various carbs; so the user will be in no doubt as to what carbs should be fitted to the vehicle - especially significant with Stromberg's, an example of such is given below with regard to Herald carbs, the Vitesse was pasted earlier on in the thread:

 

http://zenithcarb.co.uk/cf/vehicle/list/?manufacturer=Triumph&vehicle=Herald

 

Regards.

 

Richard.

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Hello Casper.

 

So which line is incorrect on their 3x tier table ??

 

Can you also clarify exactly what the table should read as per their layout ??  

 

I will drop them an email and raise it, unless you have already done so - it will be to the benefit of other Herald owners.

 

Thanks.

 

Richard.

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Line 1 is correct for 1961 1200/1147 (up to engine GA34985*E ), not 1970

 

Line 2 is a nonsense.  There were no 1200 engines in 1959 and all 1200 engines had 30mm carbs.  The 28mm item is for a 948 engine 1959-1961 and the 'Details' should show 948, not 1200

 

Line 3 should read 1961 to 1970  as should the details.  This item is for 1200/1147 from engine GA34986*E to end of production.

 

I don't know where they got teir information from

 

C.

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Hello Casper.

 

That's grand, I will contact them with the info you have provided - many thanks for doing that.

 

I also noted a mistake on one of their Rootes entry - it's only engine cc. However that said, incorect info is worse than no info IMHO.

 

-------------

 

Hello John.

 

Fully agree with that.

 

Stromberg carbs are much maligned and in fact they are equally as good as SU's and in some cases have a better delivery range. Stromberg needle range could be better.

 

I think the issue with Strom's and why people frown upon them, is that their setting up, adjusting and various jet / needle differences appear to be more complicated than SU's - in essence and on face value that may be true. In addition the carb has the rubber diaphragm which some consider a weak point - probably because "they" never think about replacing it during the annual vehicle service.

 

Twin Strom's also have a reputation for accelerated spindle wear and the linkages can be a bit "over the top". The accelerated spindle wear is probably nothing more than years & years of loyal service by the carb.

 

I think Pete & Doug will vouch for Stromberg's, as will many others - it's the usual case that once explained and the tuning know-how is demonstrated it becomes another simple straight forward  piece of induction hardware. I have them on the Vitesse and more than happy with their performance, even more so after they were fully overhauled by Gower & Lee.

 

Additionally every carb has its delivery limit point; which in some cases can be overlooked by vehicle owners looking for that extra bit of carb induction delivery.

 

Regarding ideas for the tutorial thread running on the Forum at the moment, Stromberg carb owners would welcome instruction I am sure.  

 

Regards.

 

Richard. 

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i expect to cover both makes on twiddle day 

 

i always say lay the component parts out on a plain paper and look at the design and reliability ,  

one is engineered one is a load of levers and bits 

 

leave you to work out  which i prefer,  both capable of  doing  a good job   

 

you either love em or hate em , normally due to misguided myths and fumblings rather than  proper  experience

 

who said that  

 

guess who bought a 2000 with ruddy HS4 s  on it    Ha 

 

Pete

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I vote for Strombergs! I think people are scared of them because there are so many variations, bypass valves, temperature compensators etc. Finding out what you've got and finding the relevant set up information can be confusing. I'm thinking of going to twiddle day just to ask Pete how to set up my temperature compensators! :lol:

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95% of 'problems' with Strombergs dissapear with either a new rubber diaphragm or sorting the usual after 40 plus years worn spindles.

Any Air leaks and Strombergs, a precision instrument, play up.

The reason they were fitted to US market cars was Federal regulations required that carbs would stay in tune for 50,000 miles. Most SU's would struggle to do 5,000.

 

Everything you need to know about rebuilding strombergs, including setting the temperature compensators.

 

http://www.buckeyetriumphs.org/technical/Carbs/CarbsI/CarbsI.htm

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Diaphragms ive come across realy nice flexible and supple as they should be to some aftermarket things that seem related to a dutch cap or condom for an elephant , so stiff the piston is stuck up or down and sod all in between

if its not a cross between mums marigolds and a gossamer then something is a poor copy of the originals

 

one useful hint is if they (as they do)get all wrinkled with oil a simple wash in petrol will return the baggy wrinkles to look as good as new .

 

sorry doug wrong forum again

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Hi

 

Just a point, to maybe prevent folk spending unnecessarily, I wasn't aware diaphragms were a service items that should be changed annually.

 

I have a receipt implying mine were fitted 8 years ago. Had the car 4 years and done 12,000 miles. Car used all the time, which is better for these type of components I understand.

 

Cheers, Dave    

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