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One issue with Reds particularly, is that over time they "fade", and colour matching is difficult. Some paint suppliers can now match a colour to a sample which can be useful if you are not doing a full respray? . Then, their is the Old "Ford Blue" syndrome. Some 80`s Fords came out of the factory with the same Colour, only in 26 "shades"!.

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As someone who wasted over £40 pounds recently trying to buy Dulux bathroom paint I know very well the problems of paint matching! At least with car paint many suppliers will offer a scanning service and match the mix to the current shade, if you can supply a small part. It won't work from a photograph, by the way.

One interesting thing is that they may look good in daylight, but if you've ever parked a red car under orange streetlights you end up looking at a number of unbelievably different shades! I did it once with a Spitfire and couldn't believe the patchwork effect.

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Just now, PeteH said:

One issue with Reds particularly, is that over time they "fade", and colour matching is difficult. Some paint suppliers can now match a colour to a sample which can be useful if you are not doing a full respray? . Then, their is the Old "Ford Blue" syndrome. Some 80`s Fords came out of the factory with the same Colour, only in 26 "shades"!.

Shades are still an issue. Ford Panther black comes in 10 shades (possibly more now) 

For a perfect match, my local place requires a panel to be left with them for a few days, and they match by eye. Far more accurate than the "magic eye" computer matching. To the extent I had some spraywork done by a recommended bodyshop some way from Brighton, but they asked me to get the paint matched at my local supplier as they are the most accurate(they had local suppliers, but none capable of accurate matching). Likewise a friend had some paint mixed from a "magiceye" scan, which was close, but very obvious. He was recommended the same place used. So ifyou want the best match, ask thebodyshops who they use. 

Obviously the sample needs to be cut back to get rid of any surface oxidation and fading.

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1 minute ago, Colin Lindsay said:

One interesting thing is that they may look good in daylight, but if you've ever parked a red car under orange streetlights you end up looking at a number of unbelievably different shades!

Yes, an interesting effect, caused by the lie of "primary colours". Or perhaps I should say that your eyes lie to your brain, which is why primary colours sort-of-work. And the peculiarities of certain lighting technologies.

Your eyes are sensitive to coloured light in only three "bands", from the three types of rods (or is it cones? I can never remember which is monochrome and which is colour) - there's a red band, a green band and a blue band. You distinguish colours by the proportions of each, but you can't tell a near-infra-red pure red from a not-quite-yellow-enough-to-trigger-the-green pure red. A sodium vapour lamp, though, puts out only a few very distinct frequencies of light. If the paint pigment happens to reflect that frequency then it will still look red. If it's just a little off then it won't, even though in daylight, where the whole spectrum is flooded with light, you can't tell the difference.

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