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Fuel pump


mishmosh
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I had a facet (silvertop, way better than the cube types) on my spit with twin dellortos. Had to use a pressure regulator as well as the 4-5psi was too much.

 

The mechanical pumps work well, but repro ones seem to be variable in quality.

 

HUCO are a brand which are flexible in positioning (facet must be near the tan and mounted low) pretty quiet and ideal in terms of pressure. I suspect a pump off a carb equipped motorbike would work well.

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How stripped? the threads may be saveable with care, or a helicoil or something. 

Almost every Triumph I have owned has had original pumps, and never had one fail. And that is quite a few cars, and many many miles......

The dellorto car would have used a mechanical pump, but the engine was a modern, so couldn't do it.

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Hello

         I have used a Huco suction type on my Spitfire 1500 for about 8/9000 miles witth no problem and you don't need a pressure regulator just an inertia cut off switch in case of accidents and it saves a lot of cranking to fill float bowls in hot weather or after standing for long periods.

 

Plus they come with 5 year warranty

 

Roger

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I had a facet (silvertop, way better than the cube types) on my spit with twin dellortos. Had to use a pressure regulator as well as the 4-5psi was too much.

 

 

Of course it overpowered the Dellortos, Clive!  It was a Silvertop!   Pressure 6-7psi   Flow 35 gallons (US) per hour  

 

A little solid state Facet, as I recommended, will deliver only 1.5-4psi and 25 gallons/hr, and for half the price

 

You can't shoot rabbits with a elephant gun!

Or if you try you look a little foolish!

 

Good point about the cut-off switch, Roger!  Rather than an OE Lucas one, as fitted to Pi cars, get one as fitted to Land Rover, Peugot, Ford, Maserati, Citroen, Honda, Uncle Tom modern car maker and all.    Less than a tenner from eBay, but always ask for the wiring connector as well!  http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_odkw=Fuel+cut+off+switch&_from=R40&_osacat=0&_from=R40&_trksid=p2045573.m570.l1313.TR0.TRC0.H0.XInertia+cut+off+switch&_nkw=Inertia+cut+off+switch&_sacat=0

 

 

John

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Personally, unless you are going racing, I don't see the point of electric pumps. I ran the small square-top Facet in my 1500 Herald for a while, and not only did it sound like I had demented woodpecker locked in the boot, it also overwhelmed the twin SUs. Fuel pouring out of the vent holes in the float chambers right over a hot exhaust manifold was not clever, so I duly fitted a Filter King regulator, and reduced the pressure, which required the adjusting screw being most of the way in before it stopped over-fueling. That fix worked for 6 months, before, when backing out of the drive one day, strapped in to the car, the other half screamed "stop" while making frantic slashing gestures across her throat. I did, and baled out in jig time only to find petrol pouring out of the grommet hole in the spare wheel well. After applying a hosepipe to the drive and the underside of the car, and extracting the (sodden and ruined) boot mat, I discovered that the gasket on the filter king had deformed and blown out of its seating groove, dousing everything in petrol. At this point I decided I had had enough, and stripped out the electric pump and regulator, and ordered a stock pump from Rimmer's. That worked, until it became evident that it was repro, and started leaking at a rally. Inspection proved that the fibre sealing washer from the top had been assembled on the inside, and our attempts to get it to stop leaking stripped the thread in the monkey metal it was made from, with only gentle tightening. I went to out local Triumph Breaker the next day and bought a S/H stock 1500 pump for a fiver, cleaned it and fitted it, and it is still there 3 years on.

 

Moral of this sorry saga - Triumph knew what they were doing in the first place, and if it works, don't fix it!

 

I now have the Facet mounted on a board, with a couple of leads, croc clips and lengths of fuel pipe. This slots on to the front wishbone, and I use it to draw fuel through the system at the start of each season, and to drain the system for Winter. The only thing to be said for electric pumps IMHO is that they don't flatten the battery getting modern (volatile) unleaded through a dry system after a lay-up, but to each his own!

 

Steve C

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  • 2 weeks later...

It was mounted on the bobbins, on the N/S rear inner wheel arch, complete with neatly mounted regulator and pretty Aeroquip hoses, and it still sounded like Woody Woodpecker on speed, and tried to do for me!

 

The underlying, and rather more serious point IMHO is that there is any amount of shiny stuff on the market out there, purporting to be "improvements" to our cars, much of it costing a small fortune, and some of it is cr*p. External Rocker oil feed pipes, Flintstone-hard suspension and those "essential" oil coolers, to name but three. I am not against mods per se (Lord knows, I have done enough of them) but surely half the point of classics like ours is their essential simplicity, and it is easy to modify what made the thing a classic in the first place out of it!

 

Steve

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Hello Mishmosh

                        I have the Huco fitted next to the washer pump and I can only hear it when the engine is not running and then only while it fills the float bowls(just like an SU type)not like a demented woodpecker! and 5 year warranty win win?

 

Roger

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During the late 80's I fitted an old SU electric pump to my GT6 when it was first running with a 2.5L saloon engine. This was supposed to overcome what appeared to be a fuel starvation problem above 3000rpm. It did appear to cure this but in the end the real culprit turned out to be a very badly profiled fast road cam. This was supplied by a very well known specialist, so it just goes to show that crap after market parts are nothing new.

I mounted the pump on the engine bulkhead and yes it did sound like a manic woodpecker trying to escape. I had no over-pressurisation problems but in hindsight I think this was down to the fact that the pump was designed to be mounted next to the fuel tank not the engine! I reverted back to a mechanical pump when I carried out my final engine transplant in 1993, along with a properly profiled fast road cam. This served me faithfully for the next 15 years until the pump decided to shed one of it's internal pistons. This resulted in my one and only trailer home journey in 28years of ownership.

On balance the mechanical pump is probably the better route to go. Your car was designed for this for good reason and in the end despite my experience, is the more reliable set-up.

One final point about using an electric pump-it should be fitted with an inertia safety switch. This would prevent petrol being sprayed everywhere if you suffered a ruptured fuel line In an accident. I never considered this when I had one fitted but then I never had an accident.

 

Cheers

 

Alan

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Inertia switch, Alan, good point.

NOT the old Lucas one, but a modern one like this

96.jpg

 

AS fitted to Land Rover. Range Rover, Peugot/Citroen/Renault, MINI, Old Rover/MG, Honda, Jagaur/Ford, Alfa Romeo, Uncle Tom car producer 'n'all.   Available cheap in eBay ,but always ask for the connector as well, else it's difficult to wire it in.

 

JOhn

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John

 

Yes that's exactly what I was thinking about and a good point about the connectors as well. Unbelievably, I've just realised that I need to fit one to my S1 E-Type Roadster as well. It has the SU pump submerged in the fuel tank itself. I can't believe that I hadn't noticed this before.

 

Cheers

 

Alan

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I have ordered a cheapo one as an experiment . TBH I will probably stick a mechanical pump on in the future , but want to try it out.  I have also bought a bulb type pump to prime the carbs ( as fitted on many modern diesels) better than a mouth full of petrol!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Successfully refurbished the mechanical pump on my GT6 today. Despite it being a Mk3, it has the glass top AC pump fitted, but has straked in valves - a hybrid that doesn't appear in the manuals! Diaphragm was very porous and cracked.

 

Sorted out the rear toe too, which has needed a tweak for a while - great improvement!

 

Making the most of an absence of snow and a beautiful day here in the south

 

Gully

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 hi,

up to recently I ran a mgb and the trouble I had with the electric pumps was no joke--some are really really noisy or fragile and a constant cause of problems and the club forum full of complaints and queries about pump problems if I were you I would stick with the mechanical one.

 

cheers

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