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Sump Gasket


Martie
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This is what you are likely to see; Raised areas of sump flange around the bolts holes, thanks to DPO's previous over tightening.

This is the tool you need to correct it:  a piece of 1/4" steel as a dolly, but hardwood would do as well.

This how you use it:   Place the flange over the dolly in the vice, gentle hammer blows to straighten the flange.

This what you want to see, a straight flange.  OK, they IS a slight bowing, but that doesn't matter.

A mere smear of a non-hadening sealant on the sump gasket, and when tightening the sump bolts they are 16lb/ft - that is only a little more than hand tight!

John

 

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I believe the sump threaded holes in the alloy bridge are actually open ended so will accept longer bolts (within limits). I realised this after tapping them to M10 in situ when any swarf produced must have gone into the sump, doh!

Now I have sealing washers under the heads of the new allen bolts to stop oil leaking down the threads....

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Heres one and yes if you go mad with long bolts they will come up against the main bearing cap. Otherwise its a good idea to use as much of the threads as possible and Ive used sealing washers cos I was getting oil coming down the open threads....

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22 hours ago, RogerH said:

When dressing the sump bolt hole flange I would suggest using a nylon of wooden hammer.  The steel hammer may spread/expand the metal (distortion)

Roger 

You'll notice that I use a panel-beating hammer, small, flat headed (it has a ball pein on the other end), held near the head, for a limited-power stroke.   It's tap-tap, not beating the metal into submission.

You are right, or course, Roger, but this allows a finer control, IMHO.

JOhn

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33 minutes ago, JohnD said:

You'll notice that I use a panel-beating hammer, small, flat headed (it has a ball pein on the other end), held near the head, for a limited-power stroke. 

I had to look again, all I saw first time was the teacake box... so after that subliminal message, on went the kettle and all else went out the window.

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Many years ago I managed to stop with the aid of a Land crabs towball when in my Beetle 1200. 

My uncle was a brilliant panel beater (he hand built a hard top for the Jim bereraq car with all the clamps etc - which triumph said couldn’t be done) and I have a dolly and hammer - and I panel beat the bonnet back into shape. It was so good (even if I do say so myself) that I didn’t need any filler. 

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4 minutes ago, Anglefire said:

My uncle was a brilliant panel beater (he hand built a hard top for the Jim bereraq car with all the clamps etc - which triumph said couldn’t be done) and I have a dolly and hammer - and I panel beat the bonnet back into shape. It was so good (even if I do say so myself) that I didn’t need any filler. 

Wow. Is it in the blood, you are maybe inferring?. Did he coach you?. did you practice, before the bonnet?.

Something I would love to be able to do. I guess look at lot's U tube and filter the good ones and practice a lot on scrap?.

Dave 

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No he never taught me really. I just gave it a go! I had an idea of the theory. 

This was back in about 1983/4 when the Internet was barely a thing. 

I made my axle stands at the same sort of time - I must take a picture of them when I get a tick - currently the car is sat on them! Tested to 7tonnes at the time. I've had my old Land Rover on them many a time - but that only weighed about 3tonnes all up 

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