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Best Place for inline fuel filter


Adrian
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Hello all

I have a glass fuel filter and was wondering where the best....and worst places are to fit it. Do they work better in a vertical orientation or equally as good horizontally?

I found a picture of one (horizontal) located between the metal fuel pump pipe and the carb metal feed, below and to the side of the thermostat housing. Being glass this seemed a sensibly rigid spot but perhaps not as safe as just before the fuel pump?

Thanks

Adrian 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hello Adrian.

In the ideal world, two filters should be used - one prior to the pump and one after.

A lot of classic vehicle owners use the disposable plastic type - which do the job.

I have always kept my filter horizontal with a slight bias towards the carbs, when placed after the pump.

Having not used a glass unit, I cannot give any tips.

Regards.

Richard.

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3 minutes ago, dougbgt6 said:

but plastic goes milky and you can't see nowt. 

That's interesting Doug, I have to say I've never seen that happen.

Any ideas why ??

Regards.

Richard.

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Richard,

I think it might be UV when the bonnet's up. UV dulls and brittles plastic.

Interestingly, (or not,) at the AGM we all sat on green plastic garden chairs. Half an hour into Bern's "state of the nation" piece his chair "shattered" and he fell to the floor. An hour later Micky Hazell, almost asleep, crashed to the floor! Another shattered chair. COM conceded the chairs had been stored outside and it was probably UV that was responsible. COM will be getting new chairs. 

Doug

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1 minute ago, dougbgt6 said:

I think it might be UV when the bonnet's up. UV dulls and brittles plastic chairs.

Doug,

Yes that does makes sense and we have all seen those sort of chairs, but what I cannot figure out is how you manage to drive with the bonnet in the up position !!!!!!!!!!!!! :D

Regards.

Richard.

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Richard,  xoug can do a lot of things we find unusual

If the system is clean then best filter straight out the tank,  somewhere youmcan get at it,

Doesnt matter which angle you mount it , the element is inside and doesnt know which is up or down it will filter ok

Some vapour or air inside is not a problem,

The glass ones can be stripped for cleaning, be careful on plastics ones that the tightening of the hose clip does not

collapse the filter tubes   and if its a universal  one size fits all   do make sure the filter tube bore is Not less than your feed pipes

Pete

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Also worth mentioning that the fuel filter (certainly plastic type) is direction sensitive - it should have an arrow printed thereon and this needs to be pointing towards the carb(s).

Regards.

Richard. 

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11 hours ago, dougbgt6 said:

My glass filter is vertical just before the pump. Glass can get broken, but plastic goes milky and you can't see nowt. 

Doug

If it goes milky, it's been on too long. Most of my autoparts stores locally have large plastic fuel filters for about £1, I just change them when they look tired. Like yours, Doug, mine is just in front of the fuel pump, between the outrigger and the block. 

I have some of the chrome and glass versions but unless they're securely mounted they'll break.

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I too have the disposable plastic type just before the pump. It isn't vertical nor is it horizontal either :blink: but works fine. The filter is never full of petrol but this doesn't seem to be any problem.

Where it is makes it easy to see if there is muck in etc.. and when the time comes easy to replace. It has been there for close to 3 years with no signs of dirt or discolouration.

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Odd,  my 2000 doenst suffer from any foreign bodies in the fuel, and doesnt have a filter , i think a lotdepends on the suction tube position by design 

the small chassis cars do seem to suffer   tank debris ,apart from potential rubber slivers derived from messing about with fuel lines 

and they are always after the filter

but guess now the darn thing will konk out just when  i dont want it to.

they listen you know !!!!

 

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Adrian,

That's odd. There should be some rubber to allow flexing. One piece in the passenger side rear wheel arch (not an ideal place for a filter! :lol:) And one where the pipe comes up into the engine bay, that's where my filter is. I've replaced all the pipe work between pump and carbs with R9 rubber, this reduces the incidence of the dread rubber slivers.

Doug

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My Herald 1200 had a glass in-line filter in what would be the middle of the rubber hose in your top photo; worked well but looked very obtrusive.

The GT6 filter is now where the kink is in the rubber pipe in your lower photo; just enough metal pipe coming out through the outrigger to allow it to connect.

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 4/17/2018 at 11:37 AM, dougbgt6 said:

I've replaced all the pipe work between pump and carbs with R9 rubber, this reduces the incidence of the dread rubber slivers.

Doug

Doug,  Resurrecting this as part of the process to sort a fuel misfire when hot under acceleration.  Was this 8mm hose, what route did you take and how did you attach it?  A trial run on mine and it seems to be awfully close to the top pulley.

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Dick,

Mine is clamped on the pump then one tie wrapped to the loom, then runs round between the rocker cover and the water pump and then clamped on the dual carb pipework. Some run it around the back of the engine to avoid proximity to the water pump but I've never had problems in that area.

Doug

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Doug,  Got it.  Having just had a trial run had not appreciated enough room to 'rest' the pipe between the thermostat housing and rocker cover.  Did you manage to find a spigot to go in the pump or just use a short length of pipe and a tube nut plus olive (whoever she is)?   Leatherhead looms but sure I can make it one way or another, just keep ticking off the possible causes. Dick

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