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Cleaning Oil off Drive


Anglefire
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I've spilt some oil on my tarmac drive - not just the Spitfire, but my old Land Rover as well. I used cement to soak up the majority of it, but I do have a large stain and some smaller drops.

Whats the current wisdom for getting most of it off - given that I don't want to damage the surface anymore than it already is.

I have done a search as I thought I'd read something about it - but can't find it now.

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The disco wasn’t as bad as the previous 110. 

I did get the drive relayed when I sold the 110 - and said to make sure it would stand the weight of a disco parked on it. It’s not as bad as the old drive - but the thick end of 3tonnes has left its mark. Or tramlines at least. 

Anyway thanks John I’ll give that a go. Any particular brand? ?

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3 hours ago, Pete Lewis said:

Jizer , / engine cleaner  or even polyclenes brush cleaner   dissolves the oil and wash off with water

whether  they dissolve tarmac  ...dont know 

Pete

 

They do. Anything paraffin-based (or today's equivalent!) designed to break down oil quickly will eat tarmac. Washing up liquid or washing powder works, as does cat litter on wet oil patches. Drop it on oily patches, grind or work it in, leave for a while, and brush up. I'm amazed at how much it holds but then when I look at our largest cat... I shouldn't be.

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A paste made of washing powder will dissolve tarmac. And apart from acetone is about the only thing to clean a brush used for fibreglassing...

But it is a really good detergent. Give it a whirl, mix some up with water, something resembling thin gravy is the target. Brush in, leave a while and wash off. But success on oil removal seems to depend on how long it has been soaking in.

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11 minutes ago, Andrew said:

Believe it or not try coca cola I was advised to try this and it works.

Andrew

The "active ingredient" in Coca Cola is phosphoric acid. I believe.  You may find you already have phosphoric acid in your garage supplies as it is a great de-ruster and is often used in proprietary rust removers.

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Coke contains 17mgs of phosphorus/100mls.    I can't (be bothered to) work out how much phosphoric acid that represents as H3PO4, but it's TINY.    But yes, because the acid is considered an acceptable food additive (in Coke for a "tangy" taste) it's used in processing oils for food, by forming soluble esters.  But vegetable oils.    How it will do with mineral oils, I don't know, and in the tiny amounts in Coke, not a lot, I fear.   Conc.H3PO4 perhaps, as used to treat rust, perhaps, and possibly safer than powerful detergents?

JOhn

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