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Rear Wing Finisher Clips


Mad4classics
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My N/S rear wing finisher falls at the drop of a hat if I catch it with anything at all; looks like it's only got  four clips holding it and they don't look like the right ones. Parts list calls for 16 x 613766 and 4 x 613886; half for each side.

I'm assuming the larger ones go either end and the eight smaller ones equally spaced between?

Want to get them positioned correctoneswith these it looks like once they're on they're on!

David

 

image20190424_190554957.thumb.jpg.c293f08cc52cb0ed41426b8ee3814749.jpg

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Has your car ever had new wings? The original type clips only fit if the three panels (deck, inner, outer) are of the right thickness and spot welded together with nothing stray in between. Many Spitfires end up with new wings seam welded onto partially cleaned remnants. The original clips will no longer fit if that's been done, and you'll probably have to resort to glue.

If you can use original clips, the exact positioning isn't that critical. Big ones at the ends, as you guessed, the others "evenly" spaced. If the trim is prone to popping up at one end then a slight bias towards that end may help.

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I was lucky as when I had my rear wings fitted it looks like they were done well and the chrome fits a treat. I didnt us large clips each end, just the small one all along. 

I'd recommend doubling up by using the clips and the glue, it can't hurt.

 

SP

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On 25/04/2019 at 13:39, Pete Lewis said:

pu sealer works well on some of these clip on parts . with no paint damage by the claws easy to paint if needed 

Pete

+1 When I restored my MK3 I removed all theses clips and fitted the trim with sealant. No weeping rust has appeared from under the trims.

Danny

AO NE Scotland

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3 hours ago, Badwolf said:

What type of adhesive/mastic did you use?

Hi BW,

I'm pretty sure I used black 'Sticks All' but the solvent based one not the water based. I also used it to stick on home made rubber mud flaps on the sill closing panel and these have stayed on too despite being in the line of fire from spray and road muck. I did buy and try to use the correct clips (and tool) for the window rubbers but I gave up in fury after failing to fit a single one in half an hour of tugging, levering and pleading. It felt like a bodge at the time but now I can't think of any reason why it isn't a perfectly good solution.

Still enjoying your restoration thread.

Regards

Adrian

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Aidrian -Thanks for the info on the mastic.

Glad you enjoy my ramblings and disasters on my main thread. Things will be taking off more in the next two weeks now that I have acquired the tools, products, knowledge and space to get on with it. I just hope that what I have learned is worthy of the exceptional talent of those I have learned from (includes all on here expecially Pete & Doug) over the last 6 months.

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Thanks BW!

My brother recently tried to fit the window rubbers on his Spitfire and gave up in a similar fashion to Adrian. He found a chap on Utube showing how to fit window rubbers to a TR6. The video goes on and on and the guy gets more and more frustrated until eventually he decides on double sided stick tape! Hilarious.

Doug

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I have been doing a lot of research about adhesives for use in the motor trade and feel that these could be extrememly useful for the enthusiast and that, although used widely in modern day car production, are frowned on by the purists. I also feel that with professional work being more and more expensive, and of, in some cases, being of dubious quality, the use of high quality industrial/aviation grade adhesives could be the future in keeping our cars going, especially for those who do not weld or have limited dexterity (using glue not fidley clips!!!).

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I put some pritt stick in the bottom of locating tool so the clips didnt fall off the tool into the door, fitted the outside rubbers first (theres an indent at each location to put a clip) then the internal felt strip.

It seems I got off lightly as I didn't have any trouble at all, the pritt stick keeping the clips on the tool helped loads. Without that I don't doubt £60.00 worth of fittings would have ended up in the field out the back.

 

SP. 

 

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When you look at the clip or pop rivet trim retainers used  on  all makes in the  60,s styling it was the start of body rot for many a car

Roll out the adhesive approach and ban all water based ...its generally  friendly but useless.

Pete

 

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From my research, adhesives have many advantages over welding when used in the right place. No heat distortion, no danger of fire due to rust proofing compounds, no loss of paint etc on the inside of a box section, greater strength of joint due to a greater amount of adhesive within an overlap joint compared to a weld. No doubt these comments will generate disagreement from some quarters but call it what you will.. cold welding, adhesive bonding or just plain glue (!!) with modern formulations being nothing like the old araldite of 20 years ago, they have to be a serious alternative to welding etc for classic cars in the future.

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4 hours ago, Badwolf said:

they have to be a serious alternative to welding etc for classic cars in the future.

Would be handy for me, when I can't find a welder to replace overriders on the chassis..... just slide into place and leave them to set.

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