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Vitesse HT leads


iana
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Whilst working through checking things, I cross referenced the ht leads to the cylinder and the workshop manual, it looks like the leads are 1 position out but in the correct firing order - is this an issue? 

798C295D-4232-4BEA-886C-F4C842C41460.jpeg

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Because in the workshop manual it seems to show no1, 1 position back to how the cap is connected. 

It runs - I was checking the timing so had the manual in front of me so I checked against the book for piece of mind.

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As you can fit the dizzy drive gear anywhere these things dont always follow the book

Providing no1 lead is where the rotor points on no1 compression stroke its fine and the leads  reach all plugs ok it is  not important

where no1 starts from so long as you know why it is where  it is

Pete

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The WSM gives a specific position for the distributor drive gear at TDC, and the position of the leads that it shows would be correct if you align the gear like that. However, as Pete said, you can fit that drive gear in some 20 positions and it's not easy to get a particular one, so a lot of cars don't have the leads in the "book" positions.

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Thanks Dave,

I'm intending to replace the HT leads - are the standard TSSC ones any good or are there better ones out there? I was going to order the ignition service kit as I want a dizzy cap / spare points / condenser / rotor arm.

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Daves pic looks like std tssc  shop offering 

Going   £££  mad  for some silly ones makes   no real difference

Some aftermarket leads the seals can be hard to  fit and can pop off as they squeeze back up the tapers on the cap 

The joys of well it looks ok  but  Nah.

Pete

 

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Not sure Dave's are sourced from the TSSC shop. The ones from the shop (which I use without problems) have a mixture of right angle and straight plug connectors to make sure the leads fit easily around the dizzy and avoid the alternator (they have right angle only on cylinder 1, 4 and 5) They also have a natty TSSC logo printed on the leads!

Wayne

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  • 2 weeks later...

New leads fitted , but I was hoping to keep the old ones as spares, the coil to distributor has come apart at the coil end, I’ve retrieved the end, is it possible to remake the lead or am I better scrapping it and getting another spare - any suggestions where from?

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You can buy rolls of cable online (eBay has loads) and just make up your own leads. As Pete says further up even on some of the expensive versions the ends will pull off when you try to remove them and will require crimped back on again. Single leads are also readily available; just measure how long you need yours to be, and buy accordingly.

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Thanks Colin, Id never considered making my own leads, but I may now have watched a Youtube infomat video - it looks fairly straightforward. Ive also had a go at repairing the lead - hopefully I will never need it!

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On 14/05/2019 at 16:39, JohnD said:

You really need the proper crimping tooll.

This guy makes them to order: https://mrretroleads.co.uk/

John  (Satisfied customer)

Hi John,

Is this the guy that makes the similar leads to Magnecor at a much cheaper price?

With any sparkplug cable, apply silicone grease to the outer inner insulation of boot & ceramic to prolong the life and aid removal.

Cheers,

Iain.

 

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3 hours ago, JohnD said:

No idea, Iain!

But grease, of any sort on an insulator is surely a bad idea?    Attracts and holds conductive dirt.

John

In hot dusty climates yes. But in climates like the UK then dampness is a bigger problem with HT circuits than dust. Hence the use of WD40. Grease, silicon, will keep out the moisture and is a long term form of preventative maintenance. Clean it off when you clean the spark plugs and then replace with fresh grease.

 Dave

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3 hours ago, dave.vitesse said:

In hot dusty climates yes. But in climates like the UK then dampness is a bigger problem with HT circuits than dust. Hence the use of WD40. Grease, silicon, will keep out the moisture and is a long term form of preventative maintenance. Clean it off when you clean the spark plugs and then replace with fresh grease.

 Dave

Looked out of the window recently, Dave?

Here on the Costa d'Morecambe, cloudless skies, sun's burning yer eyes out.   Hot, soon dusty!

John

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