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Ethanol Afecting Fuel line/Hoses? Opinion?


PeteH
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Hi. I am a long way from needing fuel Line as I write BUT. there has been a lot of "chatter" in the Classic media Ref; the type of flexible lines needed allegedly due to the introduction of Ethanol(s) into the Bulk Fuels.

Has anyone got first hand experience of issues, and what recommendations as to the best way to deal with this?. I have a part coil of steel pipe, from another project which I believe will be sufficient to make the Necessary Pipe run for the 13/60. OR should I go with Non Ferrous?.

Another thing Itching in the mind is removing the Mech; Fuel pump and fitting a Modern Electric one somewhere near the tank In the Boot?.

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Pete.

Ethanol is an issue, but at least in the UK the amount in fuel is not as high as in some other EU countries.

I would stick with copper fuel lines and certainly do not use any rubber fuel line that is not R9 specification - it is highly resistant to ethanol but probably not quite 100%

Steel is prone to rust inside and out.

I cannot recall exactly but I think Ethanol tends to produce more moisture - but not certain why I think that is - hopefully a chemical boffin can confirm !!

Burlen now provide ethanol proof Stromberg membranes and floats for different carbs - so that is something worth looking at.

Regards.

Richard.

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I replaced all the metal work and rubber between fuel pump and carb with one piece of R9 rubber tube. This diminishes the occurrence of the dread rubber slivers blocking the carbs. After 3 years the tube is still rubber ad shows no sign of deterioration. But, not so lucky elsewhere! The GT6 has a short rubber jointing section in the passenger side rear wheel arch. I replaced this, also 3 years ago, but not with R9 (WHY? Stupid boy!) Woke up one morning last summer to the smell of petrol, lost half a tank full. The jointing tube had turned to plastic and ruptured. Garage integral to house, doors and windows open for a week. :wacko:

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Pete.

With regard to fuel pumps, mechanical are fine provided they are in decent condition and the innards are performing properly. These pumps can be rebuilt, but you will need to source DECENT overhaul kits - not all are what they seem. If your car is running standard carburation (not heavily upgraded) then your mechanical unit will suffice.

If you upgrade your induction system to deliver more fuel faster then an electric unit is the way forward. Some can be fitted near the tank or the other end, depends what your spec & preference is.

Facet are the units most owners go for, but HUCO are also worth considering - again it depends on your requirements. As mentioned you do need a fuel cut off within the cockpit for obvious reasons.

Regards

Richard.

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1 hour ago, classiclife said:

Pete.

With regard to fuel pumps, mechanical are fine provided they are in decent condition and the innards are performing properly. These pumps can be rebuilt, but you will need to source DECENT overhaul kits - not all are what they seem. If your car is running standard carburation (not heavily upgraded) then your mechanical unit will suffice.

If you upgrade your induction system to deliver more fuel faster then an electric unit is the way forward. Some can be fitted near the tank or the other end, depends what your spec & preference is.

Facet are the units most owners go for, but HUCO are also worth considering - again it depends on your requirements. As mentioned you do need a fuel cut off within the cockpit for obvious reasons.

Regards

Richard.

Hello All

                 Fit a HUCO they are quite and need no regulator and come  a 5 year warranty! I ran one for about 5 years before I went to EFI 

Facets to me a are the DEVILS device and noisy and not needed for SU,s or Strombergs.

But DO fit a cut out switch like all moderns they are cheap on Fleabay just make sure you get the plug with it!

Roger

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Thanks for that. I was wondering about the use of steel pipe, although as it is now intended as my "toy" rather that an everyday vehicle. the longevity may not be quite so crucial. Saying that IF Ethanol is Hygroscopic, corrosion might be a greater factor?. Albeit that it requires access to air to take place normally. (oxidation in the presence of moisture). Thanks for the tip about Cohline 2240. the fact that Copper or copper alloy should be easier to form might be the decider.

 

Pete

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I've a few non R9 fuel hose pieces on my car around the carbs which have lasted with no problems for the past 5 years (at least). However, both the PO and I have always used Millers fuel additive which includes an anti-ethanol treatment.

Gully

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I have  been fitting EFI to my Herald. On Tuesday I powered up the fuel pump to set the system pressure. A couple of leaks from joints, soon sorted by nipping up the joint but the only remaining none R9 rubber hose (from the original feed to the carbs, I had forgotten about this hose) was leaking badly. Fuel was coming thru the body of the hose, it was completely porous. 

This wasn't leaking before I drained the fuel from the car so I think its had dried out and then started leaking as soon as there was fuel in the hose.

So the answer is yes its a real problem, if you haven't got R9 hose you will need them.

I have also brought hose from AFS very good price and delivery!

mike

 

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10 hours ago, Gully said:

I've a few non R9 fuel hose pieces on my car around the carbs which have lasted with no problems for the past 5 years (at least). However, both the PO and I have always used Millers fuel additive which includes an anti-ethanol treatment.

Gully

Me too, I haven't noticed any problems so far; the only additive I use regularly is Redex. Wonder if that makes any difference?

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 26/01/2018 at 8:23 PM, Pete Lewis said:

Colin, is that on your cereal or in the coffee!!!!

 

Remember when redex was 1d a shot??? At the pumps

 

Pete

Yes, But then Petrol, was in the region of 1/6d (or less?) per GALLON.

Pete

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On 1/26/2018 at 8:36 AM, Colin Lindsay said:

Me too, I haven't noticed any problems so far; the only additive I use regularly is Redex. Wonder if that makes any difference?

Hello Colin

                   Adding oil to petrol effectively lowers the octane rating (I think) but I do not suppose a shot per gallon makes much difference to the chemical brew they call petrol?

Roger

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Doubt it, but then I buy the stuff from Tescos at £2 a bottle and usually throw the entire lot in at one go....

I used to have an old glass Redex dispenser, it was one of my first eBay casualties and sold for a lot more than I paid for it.

Anyway Pete, these days there are enough additives on cereal without me adding any more!

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