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Mk2 Vitesse drive shaft conversion.


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Hi Pete you are probably aware that you can fit telescopic dampers without fitting CV halfshafts.
It is just a bolt on extension on the top chassis member.
From what info I can find the parts to make the original CV conversions are becoming scarce.
A few people recommend replacing tired donuts with Metalistik donuts\, more expensive than alternatives but they last longer and are original spec.

I tried to find the lever damper shock mounts for the Mk2 Vitesse as I have a Herald chassis I am converting to fit under my Mk2 but it looks like I will have to carefully cut them from the old chassis and weld them to the replacement.


 

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Hi ahebron.

Thank you your comments. I have read posts about rear driveshafts breaking - which worries me . I believe there is a CV driveshaft conversion which helps to overcome this issue Plus avoids the replacement of the donuts. I’ve seen a company called Classic car developments sell them but I’d like to find out which manufacturer is best and if any concerns have been identified when using them? 
 

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I have converted my Vitesse mk2 to vertical shocks using the kit from the Club Shop . The hardest part for me was fitting the top brackets which go between the body shell and the chassis so you need to have to undo the chassis bolts and Jack up the body which in most cases will be very difficult . I did manage to raise the body but not enough so the brackets needed drifting in . I’ve stayed with doughnuts purchased from Canleys and so far ok 

Paul 

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6 hours ago, Puglet1 said:

Hi ahebron.

Thank you your comments. I have read posts about rear driveshafts breaking - which worries me . I believe there is a CV driveshaft conversion which helps to overcome this issue Plus avoids the replacement of the donuts. I’ve seen a company called Classic car developments sell them but I’d like to find out which manufacturer is best and if any concerns have been identified when using them? 
 

Hi Again Pete

Great to meet you and your wife at Silverstone on Saturday

I've never heard any instances of Drive shafts snapping on MK2 Vitesse models, you may be getting mixed up with the earlier Swing Axle cars, this can and does happen to these cars.

I have heard of rare occurrences of the inner UJ failing spectacularly on the MK2 Vitesse's and when the Roto-flex couplings fail it can end up very messy and could potentially cause a wheel to lock up and the car to spin off!! So the CV's jointed shafts will omit this potential problem and give you peace of mind. 

I think the main reason people convert to CV Driveshafts with the Mk2 Suspension is to do away with the Roto-flex Drive couplings which are expensive now (for the genuine article) and are a pain to swop. 

In answer to who's are best, I can't answer that question, I know CDD have been making them for a number of years and I've heard mostly good stories from people who have fitted them.

You may find some of the other Traders may supply the CDD Ones.  

Regards

Gary

Edited by Gary Flinn
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Hi Gary. Really good to meet you and you father in law too.

Thank you for sharing your knowledge, it puts me at ease to hear from people that are far more knowledgeable with these subjects 👍.

 I shall give CDD a ring to find out as much as I can before committing to the next step. 
Best regards.

Pete

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I have Classic Driving Developments CV shafts, purchased from Rimmers. They are very nicely engineered. You still have to set up the hub bearing endfloat as it still uses a spacer and shims  exactly as per original. However, you eliminate the troublesome/expensive rotoflex doughnut. So the only remaining tension in the rear suspension is the transverse spring. You can also convert to telescopic shocks without add on brackets, as you use the original top mounting point for the damper, which is still present on the chassis, al la Vit Mk 1. I have done this also. The conversion brackets were only necessary to clear the donut. It's not needed for CV shaft fit.

 

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22 minutes ago, trigolf said:

I have Classic Driving Developments CV shafts, purchased from Rimmers. They are very nicely engineered. You still have to set up the hub bearing endfloat as it still uses a spacer and shims  exactly as per original. However, you eliminate the troublesome/expensive rotoflex doughnut. So the only remaining tension in the rear suspension is the transverse spring. You can also convert to telescopic shocks without add on brackets, as you use the original top mounting point for the damper, which is still present on the chassis, al la Vit Mk 1. I have done this also. The conversion brackets were only necessary to clear the donut. It's not needed for CV shaft fit.

 

Thanks Trigolf , I didn’t realise CV shafts don’t need the additional bracket 

Paul 

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  • 11 months later...
6 hours ago, jdaley said:

I cannot find details of the vertical shocks kit from the Club Shop . Can someboidy help me please?

It's that red bracket in the headline that you need: 40.jpg?itok=iK5Cix8x

Plus a suitable damper.      I can't find where the Shop lists them, suggest you email to enquire.

JOhn

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I believe but may be wrong that the CDD ones are the only ones available now since Jigsaw went but I don`t know who supplied theirs, I have a set of CDD to go on my 13/60 Herald. I have all the parts and Mike Papworth is going to build them up for me including Timken bearings. You still need the hub shims which is why I asked him to do it as I don`t have the tools or a clue how to do it.

My tuned 2.5 Vitesse which started life as a swing axle MK1 was converted to Roto and the Jones/Bowler Volvo/Metro CV option that used to be around with an MGF hub bearing meaning no shims required. The parts for these are becoming harder to get and I don`t think the chap I bought them from does these any more. 

I`ve owned it for 40 years and never heard of a Roto shaft breaking. As Gary said it`s more the quality and availability of the doughnuts and it supposedly being a pita to change them.

Steve

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I've changed the Rotaflex's insitu by cutting the new Roto's manufacturers compression band then forcing the free roto over the tripod flange then re compressing the roto using a DIY 2 part hex compressor ie thin bar with bolt each end and then juggling the 6 bolts back into position, been like that 15 years with no damage. 

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