Jump to content

Last minute essential stocking filler


stoofa
 Share

Recommended Posts

Another urban myth, I fear.  The very first microwave ovens had a door to keep the radiation  inside, as believe it or not, the engineers who designed them understood microwaves!   See: http://www.smecc.org/microwave_oven.htm  "A Brief History of the Microwave Oven.

And it is of course possible to remove the door, but all modern ovens have at least three switches that will prevent it working if the door is not closed.

And!  "Strange tingling in the hands"!   More like agonising pain - microwaves as Anglefire says cook the flesh - its what they do! -  and produce deep tissue burns.

The safety of the laser is due to the very limited wavelength of laser light - almost a single wavelength, or colour.     Materials absorb and reflect different wavelengths, that's why they are different colours.   If the laser wavelength is absorbed, then the energy on the beam is also absorbed, and I presume this device is tuned to Iron oxide.      Gold, in a finger ring, or even flesh, as well as the metal beneath the rust, reflect the laser, niot absorb it and so are unaffected.       I'm intrigued though, the iron in Haemoglobin, the red stuff that carries oxygen around our bodies is Fe-- (it has lost two electrons) and probabkly loses another to bind to the oxygen it carries.    Heam in venous blood is more in the Fe2- state - and so is iron in rust, ferric oxide!    So, probably not a good idea to shine the laser at the veins on the back of your hand!

John

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, Pete Lewis said:

one advantage of the old gas copper and mangle,..............  nothing to go wrong

 

Hello Pete

                 I beg to differ what about if the wooden rollers rot? or ice jams the gears(they were always used outside when I saw them!)don,t forget the posher or dolly depending what part of the country you live

I can remember sitting in the dolly tub with my cousin on a hot summers day(blow up paddling pools not thought of back then)

We have an old push Ewbank carpet sweeper that was a wedding present!(back in nineteen canteen)it still works but the rubber tyres are perishing and apart from rolling on the floor they turn the brush(I wonder if I can get spares or re tyred?)

Roger

ps this from the garage! 2 of the Vaseline tins are still full! and it says refined in USA on the side

Could you imagine any of the modern generation keeping stuff this long? (Just buy new they say! and then have not got a pot to P***s in)

DSC05896.JPG

DSC05890.JPG

DSC05887.JPG

DSC05888.JPG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

my mums mangle lived in the kitchen rubber rollers and it folded into a varnished , enamel topped work cupboard , very modern , great top for pastry making,

went to a jumble sale when we cleared the house a few years back , never ever seen one like it anywhere. 

youre not alone with old tins , ive got and still use some Chemico

and mum had a tin of evaporated milk in the store for a rainy day  , by appointment to George 6th  it went to the local museum shop .

 1968, we had  a ewbank copy for a wedding present it woudnt do anything apart from tip up and empty everything out on the floor

move on 50 yrs and the Getech air ram sweeper is a cracker 

Pete

Edited by Pete Lewis
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pete! You've mastered editing, is there no end to you're skills? Does that come up every time? I edit some of mine 3 or 4 times! :lol:

John, I'm sure you're right about tingling/excruciating pain, but show me the microwave and I'll make it work without a door! 60 years ago I couldn't spell engineer, now I is one.

Doug

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sure doug, you can jimmie the switches, just like you can unscrew the door hinges, but that is a bit like, in the words of St. Terry "Standing on a hill in a thunderstorm, wearing copper armour and shouting, 'All gods are bastards!' "

John

PS St.Terry, whatever he was, was not an engineer - the copper armour would have left the wearer unharmed, even by a divine lightning strike.   Toasted by the resistive heating of the copper, maybe, but unharmed.  But his meaning is abundantly, lyrically, clear!

PPS My mother, as long as I can remember, had a Bendix washing machine, which she still had long after my dad retired.  It probably lasted forty years. No, they dn't make things like they used to.

PPPS Terry Pratchett should have been a Lord, but canonisation will do, as he could have been much funnier with that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, JohnD said:

Another urban myth, I fear.  The very first microwave ovens had a door to keep the radiation  inside, as believe it or not, the engineers who designed them understood microwaves!   See: http://www.smecc.org/microwave_oven.htm  "A Brief History of the Microwave Oven.

And it is of course possible to remove the door, but all modern ovens have at least three switches that will prevent it working if the door is not closed.

And!  "Strange tingling in the hands"!   More like agonising pain - microwaves as Anglefire says cook the flesh - its what they do! -  and produce deep tissue burns.

You could well be right John, as I did a quick search after I posted and couldn't find it - it was some time ago that I read it, not even sure of the source - I do think the early radars brought down birds flying through the path of the beam - but I suspect that might be an urban myth too!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No upmarket washing machine when I was young, just a tub with a gas ring to heat the water and a wooden pole to stir the clothes. The gas connection was a flexible pipe with a rubber connector to push on to a tap on the side of the gas cooker.

Health and safety, what's that?.

Regards

Paul

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Aye, when I was young the greatest danger in washing clothes was falling into the river... 

Incidentally: do you know where Roger's phrase "not having a pot to p**s in" comes from? Back before even Pete was born, people who were poor peed in a pot which was then sold to leather tanners who used urine to tan animal skins. These people were referred to as "P**s poor". Those who were even poorer couldn't afford a pot and so "didn't have a pot to P**s in"... 

And the Joseph Rowntree Foundation talks about poverty these days... 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i had one under the bed ,   alsways called it a guzunder   but dont think dad used it on his shoes or wash leathers  maybe he just tanned my behind 

 

it didnt get flung out the window either , and if i find it theres an un censored pic of me infront of the fire in tin bath

there again i was only 3.5 lbs and a bit early ,  you make up for these things as you age 

where's me slippers 

Pete

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If memory serves the phrase ‘pot to piss in’ relates to the fact that poor used to take their urine to the local tanners for use in the leather tanning process, and in the process were paid.

The really poor couldn’t afford a pot, and therefore couldn’t take their urine to the tanners, and didn’t get paid.

Karl

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...