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Too slack?


Tanky
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thats not far from normal if you did remove a link it woth be too short , a chain does wear as do the sprockets each chain pivot takes on wear so the effective lenght grows as use takes its toll,

a new chain would be somewhat better but will not remove the slack much,

whiles its off i would get a reputable replacement , but do read up the cam timing as the big sprocket bolt holes allow a 1/4 tooth adjustment so from the 4 holes and two sides there is a good deal of fine adjustment to get the cam timing right its a fiddle but worth doing properly,

Pete

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13 minutes ago, Tanky said:

I can't see a link that breaks the chain

Contrary to what Stevie Nicks sings you CAN break the chain. I don't see it on your vid, it's there somewhere.

There should be a tensioner in the cover, is the movement of your finger greater than the tensioner can cope with?

Doug

 

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OR,

Fit the seal extension onto the crank nose AFTER installing the cover.  The added space around the crank nose makes engaging the chian onto the tensioner much easier.

Then, insert the extansion onto the crank, bevel end first  (to the rear).

If you fit the extension before fitting the cover, by hooking back the tensioner, have the extension bevel forward, so that it goes through the oil seal easily.

John

 

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4 hours ago, JohnD said:

OR,

Fit the seal extension onto the crank nose AFTER installing the cover.  The added space around the crank nose makes engaging the chian onto the tensioner much easier.

Then, insert the extansion onto the crank, bevel end first  (to the rear).

If you fit the extension before fitting the cover, by hooking back the tensioner, have the extension bevel forward, so that it goes through the oil seal easily.

John

 

I think we're talking about a four cylinder engine here, in which case there's no seal extension or spacer on the crank nose. Colin or Pete will tell us for certain.

The timing cover oil seal runs on the crank pulley if I recall and the pulley is secured to the threaded crank nose by a sleeve nut. So I would fit the oil seal to the cover, loosely bolt the cover to the engine, then gently slide the pulley onto the crank to centre the oil seal, and after that tighten the cover bolts. Before offering up the pulley, clean the face on which the seal runs and polish with fine wet & dry; clean it well and lubricate seal and pulley with lots of oil so it all slips together easily without damaging the seal.

Nigel

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57 minutes ago, Nigel Clark said:

I think we're talking about a four cylinder engine here, in which case there's no seal extension or spacer on the crank nose. Colin or Pete will tell us for certain.

I must admit to an act of craven cowardice earlier in the day; I read it, went to post, then thought: nah, John's probably right...

Incidentally, last tensioner I replaced, I couldn't get the washers back onto the spindle AND replace the split pin. The innermost one closest to the cover just would not allow both washer and pin, despite the fact that they came off. I'm reusing the same washer in case it's some kind of specially thin variety, but still no go. Any tips?

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2 minutes ago, Colin Lindsay said:

I must admit to an act of craven cowardice earlier in the day; I read it, went to post, then thought: nah, John's probably right...

Incidentally, last tensioner I replaced, I couldn't get the washers back onto the spindle AND replace the split pin. The innermost one closest to the cover just would not allow both washer and pin, despite the fact that they came off. I'm reusing the same washer in case it's some kind of specially thin variety, but still no go. Any tips?

Haha, we all love that kind of honesty!

About the tensioner pivot pin... They are fiddly. I've done them a few times, using the original washers, placing the spilt pin through the hole with small, thin nose pliers then rotating the pivot pin so the open end of the split pin points towards the middle of the cover. The head of the pin is then held against the inside of the cover with the pliers while the ends are tickled apart with a small screwdriver.

Only needs three hands!

Nigel

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The whole split pin thing for the tensioner had me thinking when I put mine back together the other day... what if you only fitted the pin between the cover and the bracket? Would it matter? I mean, once it's all bolted together, where's the pin going to go? With just the "front" split pin through it it can't move forward or rearward enough to come out? In the end I fitted both and washer anyway.

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4 minutes ago, Pete Lewis said:

can you imagine working  on the engine assy fitting those pins and washers  all day long ............ they only employed people with 3 pairs of hands  

The trouble with such tasks is that we amateurs only perform them occasionally.

We learn how to do it the hard way, we get the job done, and by the time we need to do it again several years later, we've forgotten how. Advancing age doesn't help either.

Try refitting the securing pins into a Triumph window winder handle if you haven't done it for a while... Back to square one!

Nigel

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With the cover off the engine and on your bench, you rotate the tensioner 180deg from its operating position. At the pivot pin end it's just wrapped round and pressed. Pull the two leaves of the tensioner apart from each other and the hook round the pin opens up. Push (fairly firmly) on the other end of the leaves and the pin slips through the gap. Then just slide the tensioner off.

Re-fitting is a reversal of the removal procedure, as they say. Except it's easier - just push it fulliy home and "click", you're done.

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i must admit fist time i fought the split pin to  destruction and on refit looked at the folded boing bit of zebedee and thought  that would spring over which it does 

getting the chain hook out from under the cover and get covered in sealer is also a challenge  for sticky fingers .

pete

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20 hours ago, Nigel Clark said:

 

Try refitting the securing pins into a Triumph window winder handle if you haven't done it for a while... Back to square one!

Nigel

That job is dead easy Nigel, use screen washer tubing heated up and stretched to make it thinner. Insert pin and its gripped, then the pin can't ping into the distance. Put pin in hole, and pull tubing down and it leaves the pin in hole. two minute job every time :) 

Tony. 

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11 minutes ago, poppyman said:

That job is dead easy Nigel, use screen washer tubing heated up and stretched to make it thinner. Insert pin and its gripped, then the pin can't ping into the distance. Put pin in hole, and pull tubing down and it leaves the pin in hole. two minute job every time :) 

Tony. 

Haha! How did you know, that's the exact method that I spent 30 years developing.

Nigel

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